avert

[uh-vurt]
verb (used with object)
  1. to turn away or aside: to avert one's eyes.
  2. to ward off; prevent: to avert evil; to avert an accident.

Origin of avert

1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French avertirLatin āvertere, equivalent to ā- a-4 + vertere to turn
Related formsa·vert·ed·ly, adverba·vert·er, nouna·vert·i·ble, a·vert·a·ble, adjectiveun·a·vert·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unaverted

Historical Examples of unaverted

  • The Earl again trotted gently on, raising his hat most deferentially as he came along side of her, as usual, unaverted head.

    Ask Momma

    R. S. Surtees

  • For all that she was of exceptional intellectual enterprise, she had never yet considered these things with unaverted eyes.

    Ann Veronica

    H. G. Wells

  • The sun went down: Theresa gazed with unaverted looks upon the splendor, and both her fine eyes filled with tears.


British Dictionary definitions for unaverted

avert

verb (tr)
  1. to turn away or asideto avert one's gaze
  2. to ward off; prevent from occurringto avert danger
Derived Formsavertible or avertable, adjective

Word Origin for avert

C15: from Old French avertir, from Latin āvertere; see averse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unaverted

avert

v.

c.1400, from Old French avertir (12c.), "turn, direct; avert; make aware," from Vulgar Latin *advertire, from Latin avertere "to turn away, to drive away," from ab- "from, away" (see ab-) + vertere "to turn" (see versus). Related: Averted; averting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper