unify

[yoo-nuh-fahy]
verb (used with or without object), u·ni·fied, u·ni·fy·ing.
  1. to make or become a single unit; unite: to unify conflicting theories; to unify a country.

Origin of unify

1495–1505; < Late Latin ūnificāre, equivalent to Latin ūni- uni- + -ficāre -fy
Related formsu·ni·fi·er, nounnon·u·ni·fied, adjectivequa·si-u·ni·fied, adjectivere·u·ni·fy, verb (used with object), re·u·ni·fied, re·u·ni·fy·ing.un·u·ni·fied, adjective

Synonyms for unify

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unifier

Contemporary Examples of unifier

Historical Examples of unifier

  • In which Bismarck reaches the zenith of his stupendous career; diplomatist, ministerial Cæsar, unifier of his country.

    Blood and Iron

    John Hubert Greusel

  • In October, 1600, with seventy-five thousand men, the future unifier of Japan stood on the ever-memorable field of Sékigahara.

    The Religions of Japan

    William Elliot Griffis


British Dictionary definitions for unifier

unify

verb -fies, -fying or -fied
  1. to make or become one; unite
Derived Formsunifiable, adjectiveunifier, noun

Word Origin for unify

C16: from Medieval Latin ūnificāre, from Latin ūnus one + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unifier

unify

v.

c.1500, "to make into one," from Middle French unifier (14c.), from Late Latin unificare "make one," from Latin uni- "one" (see uni-) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Related: Unified; unifying. Unified (field) theory in physics is recorded from 1935.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper