perceptive

[ per-sep-tiv ]
/ pərˈsɛp tɪv /

adjective

having or showing keenness of insight, understanding, or intuition: a perceptive analysis of the problems involved.
having the power or faculty of perceiving.
of, relating to, or showing perception.

Origin of perceptive

1650–60; < Latin percept(us) (see percept) + -ive
Related forms
Can be confusedperceptible perceptive
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unperceptive

  • Even to Gilfain's unperceptive mind the opening for a sweeping lie seemed a trifle too wide.

    The Three Sapphires|W. A. Fraser
  • Disquiet was in the air, and Char knew that only the unperceptive Trevellyan was unaware of an impending crisis.

    The War-Workers|E.M. Delafield

British Dictionary definitions for unperceptive

perceptive

/ (pəˈsɛptɪv) /

adjective

quick at perceiving; observant
perceptual
able to perceive
Derived Formsperceptively, adverbperceptiveness or perceptivity, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unperceptive

perceptive


adj.

1650s, from Latin percept-, past participle stem of percipere (see perceive) + -ive. In reference to intelligence from 1860. From mid-15c. as the name of a type of optical instrument. Related: Perceptively; perceptiveness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for unperceptive

perceptive

[ pər-sĕptĭv ]

adj.

Of or relating to perception.
Having the ability to perceive.
Keenly discerning.
Related formsper′cep•tivi•ty (pûr′sĕp-tĭvĭ-tē) n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.