vary

[ vair-ee ]
/ ˈvɛər i /
||

verb (used with object), var·ied, var·y·ing.

verb (used without object), var·ied, var·y·ing.

Origin of vary

1300–50; Middle English varien < Latin variāre, equivalent to vari(us) (see various) + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unvarying

British Dictionary definitions for unvarying

vary

/ (ˈvɛərɪ) /

verb varies, varying or varied

to undergo or cause to undergo change, alteration, or modification in appearance, character, form, attribute, etc
to be different or cause to be different; be subject to change
(tr) to give variety to
(intr foll by from) to differ, as from a convention, standard, etc
(intr) to change in accordance with another variableher mood varies with the weather; pressure varies directly with temperature and inversely with volume
(tr) music to modify (a theme) by the use of variation
Derived Formsvarying, adjectivevaryingly, adverb

Word Origin for vary

C14: from Latin variāre, from varius various
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unvarying

vary


v.

mid-14c. (transitive); late 14c. (intransitive), from Old French varier, from Latin variare "change, alter, make different," from varius "varied, different, spotted;" perhaps related to varus "bent, crooked, knock-kneed," and varix "varicose vein," from a PIE root *wer- (1) "high raised spot or other bodily infirmity" (cf. Old English wearte "wart," Swedish varbulde "pus swelling," Latin verruca "wart"). Related: Varied; varying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for unvarying

vary

[ vârē ]

v.

To make or cause changes in the characteristics or attributes of; modify or alter.
To undergo or show change.
To be different; deviate.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.