vail

1
[ veyl ]
/ veɪl /

verb (used with object)

to let sink; lower.
Archaic. to take off or doff (one's hat), as in respect or submission.

Origin of vail

1
1300–50; Middle English valen, aphetic variant of avalen (now obsolete) < Middle French avaler to move down, verbal derivative of phrase a val down (literally, to the valley) (a to (< Latin ad) + val vale)

Definition for vailing (2 of 3)

vail

2
[ veyl ]
/ veɪl /
Archaic.

verb (used with or without object)

to be of use or profit; avail.

noun

a tip; gratuity.

Origin of vail

2
1250–1300; Middle English; aphetic variant of avail

Definition for vailing (3 of 3)

vail

3
[ veyl ]
/ veɪl /
Obsolete

noun

a veil.

verb (used with object)

to veil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for vailing

  • Page 110 'vailing' to 'veiling' 'cigar smoke half-veiling his'

  • A Scotch mist had risen from the lake, and settled over the mountains, vailing all the grand features of the landscape.

    The Lost Lady of Lone|E.D.E.N. Southworth

British Dictionary definitions for vailing (1 of 3)

vail

1
/ (veɪl) /

verb (tr) obsolete

to lower (something, such as a weapon), esp as a sign of deference or submission
to remove (the hat, cap, etc) as a mark of respect or meekness

Word Origin for vail

c14 valen, from obsolete avalen, from Old French avaler to let fall, from Latin ad vallem, literally: to the valley, that is, down, from ad to + vallis valley

British Dictionary definitions for vailing (2 of 3)

vail

2
/ (veɪl) /

noun, verb

an archaic word for avail

British Dictionary definitions for vailing (3 of 3)

vail

3
/ (veɪl) /

noun, verb

an archaic spelling of veil
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012