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View synonyms for vitiate

vitiate

[ vish-ee-eyt ]

verb (used with object)

, vi·ti·at·ed, vi·ti·at·ing.
  1. to impair the quality of; make faulty; spoil.
  2. to impair or weaken the effectiveness of.
  3. to make legally defective or invalid; invalidate:

    to vitiate a claim.



vitiate

/ ˈvɪʃɪˌeɪt /

verb

  1. to make faulty or imperfect
  2. to debase, pervert, or corrupt
  3. to destroy the force or legal effect of (a deed, etc)

    to vitiate a contract



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Derived Forms

  • ˈvitiˌator, noun
  • ˈvitiable, adjective
  • ˌvitiˈation, noun
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Other Words From

  • viti·ation noun
  • viti·ator noun
  • nonvi·ti·ation noun
  • un·viti·ated adjective
  • un·viti·ating adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of vitiate1

First recorded in 1525–35; from Latin vitiātus, past participle of vitiāre “to spoil, impair,” derivative of vitium “blemish, defect, fault” + -ātus; vice 1, -ate 1
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Word History and Origins

Origin of vitiate1

C16: from Latin vitiāre to injure, from vitium a fault
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Example Sentences

The result will be provisions that are watered down or loopholes that vitiate key provisions altogether.

Nor does misdescription of the note vitiate the notice unless the party to whom the notice is given is in fact misled thereby.

But the insertion by the payee of the words "interest" after the making of a note by authority of maker will not vitiate it.

Space forbids arguing this point, but the writer is confident it can be shown that this does not vitiate the process in the least.

The possibilities for contagion vitiate all proofs of the predisposition idea.

This assumption would vitiate the promise of his coming made to our first parents.

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vitiableviticetum