vocalize

[voh-kuh-lahyz]

verb (used with object), vo·cal·ized, vo·cal·iz·ing.

verb (used without object), vo·cal·ized, vo·cal·iz·ing.


Also especially British, vo·cal·ise.

Origin of vocalize

First recorded in 1660–70; vocal + -ize
Related formsvo·cal·i·za·tion, nounvo·cal·iz·er, nounmis·vo·cal·i·za·tion, nounnon·vo·cal·i·za·tion, nounsub·vo·cal·ize, verb, sub·vo·cal·ized, sub·vo·cal·iz·ing.un·vo·cal·ized, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for vocalize

Contemporary Examples of vocalize

Historical Examples of vocalize

  • Vocalize always upon A, and be careful to put no B's before it.

  • Amos Adams threw back his grizzled head in a laugh that failed to vocalize.

    In the Heart of a Fool

    William Allen White

  • Her voice cracked; her ear became demoralized; her attempts to vocalize grew almost as comical as Trilby's.

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier

  • We have all heard voices that were so beautiful that to hear one of them vocalize for half an hour would be a musical feast.

  • Minnehaha is one of those fearless singers who vocalize without a safety-valve.


British Dictionary definitions for vocalize

vocalize

vocalise

verb

to express with or use the voice; articulate (a speech, song, etc)
(tr) to make vocal or articulate
(tr) phonetics
  1. to articulate (a speech sound) with voice
  2. to change (a consonant) into a vowel
another word for vowelize
(intr) to sing a melody on a vowel, etc
Derived Formsvocalization or vocalisation, nounvocalizer or vocaliser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for vocalize
v.

1660s, from vocal + -ize. Related: Vocalized; vocalizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper