wake-up

[ weyk-uhp ]
/ ˈweɪkˌʌp /

noun

an act or instance of waking up.
an act or instance of being awakened: I asked the hotel desk for a wake-up at 6.
a time of awaking or being awakened: I'll need a 5 o'clock wake-up to make the early plane.

adjective

serving to wake one from sleep: Tell the front desk you want a wake-up call.
serving to arouse or alert: a wake-up call on the problems of pollution.

Origin of wake-up

First recorded in 1835–45; noun, adj. use of verb phrase wake up

Definition for wake-up (2 of 2)

wake

1
[ weyk ]
/ weɪk /

verb (used without object), waked or woke, waked or wok·en, wak·ing.

verb (used with object), waked or woke, waked or wok·en, wak·ing.

noun

Origin of wake

1
before 900; (v.) in sense “to become awake” continuing Middle English waken, Old English *wacan (found only in past tense wōc and the compounds onwacan, āwacan to become awake; see awake (v.)); in sense “to be awake” continuing Middle English waken, Old English wacian (cognate with Old Frisian wakia, Old Saxon wakōn, Old Norse vaka, Gothic wakan); in sense “to rouse from sleep” continuing Middle English waken, replacing Middle English wecchen, Old English weccan, probably altered by association with the other senses and with the k of Old Norse vaka; (noun) Middle English: state of wakefulness, vigil (late Middle English: vigil over a dead body), probably continuing Old English *wacu (found only in nihtwacu night-watch); all ultimately < Germanic *wak- be lively; akin to watch, vegetable, vigil

SYNONYMS FOR wake

ANTONYMS FOR wake

Related forms

wak·er, nounhalf-wak·ing, adjectiveun·waked, adjectiveun·wak·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wake-up

British Dictionary definitions for wake-up (1 of 3)

wake-up


noun

Australian informal an alert or intelligent person
be a wake-up to Australian informal to be fully alert to (a person, thing, action, etc)

British Dictionary definitions for wake-up (2 of 3)

wake

1
/ (weɪk) /

verb wakes, waking, woke or woken

noun

Derived Forms

waker, noun

Word Origin for wake

Old English wacian; related to Old Frisian wakia, Old High German wahtēn

usage

Where there is an object and the sense is the literal one wake (up) and waken are the commonest forms: I wakened him; I woke him (up). Both verbs are also commonly used without an object: I woke up . Awake and awaken are preferred to other forms of wake where the sense is a figurative one: he awoke to the danger

British Dictionary definitions for wake-up (3 of 3)

wake

2
/ (weɪk) /

noun

the waves or track left by a vessel or other object moving through water
the track or path left by anything that has passedwrecked houses in the wake of the hurricane

Word Origin for wake

C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse vaka, vök hole cut in ice, Swedish vak, Danish vaage; perhaps related to Old Norse vökr, Middle Dutch wak wet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for wake-up

wake


A funeral celebration, common in Ireland, at which the participants stay awake all night keeping watch over the body of the dead person before burial. A wake traditionally involves a good deal of feasting and drinking.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with wake-up

wake


In addition to the idioms beginning with wake

, also see

  • in the wake of
  • to wake the dead

.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.