weald

[weeld]
See more synonyms for weald on Thesaurus.com

Origin of weald

before 1150; Middle English weeld, Old English weald forest; cognate with German Wald; cf. wold1
Can be confusedweald wield

Weald

[weeld]
noun
  1. The, a region in SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and Essex counties: once a forest area; now an agricultural region.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for weald

Historical Examples of weald

  • But Weald feared he might bring death back to Weald if he were allowed to return.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • So he was definitely unpopular when his ship lifted from Weald.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • He went through the filmed record of every inspection ever made on Weald and on Dara.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • But they ought to be told about the arrival of that ship at Weald, and what Weald thinks about it!

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • It's practically certain that there are other, agents, if you like that word better, on Weald.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster


British Dictionary definitions for weald

weald

noun
  1. British archaic open or forested country

Word Origin for weald

Old English; related to Old Saxon, Old High German wald, Old Norse vollr, probably related to wild

Weald

noun
  1. the Weald a region of SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and East and West Sussex between the North Downs and the South Downs: formerly forested
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for weald
n.

Old English (West Saxon) weald "forest, woodland," specifically the forest between the North and South Downs in Sussex, Kent, and Surrey; a West Saxon variant of Anglian wald (see wold).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper