webbing

[ web-ing ]
/ ˈwɛb ɪŋ /

noun

a strong, woven material of hemp, cotton, or jute, in bands of various widths, used for belts, carrying straps, harness, etc.
such woven bands nailed on furniture under springs or upholstery, for support.
Zoology. the membrane forming a web or webs.
something resembling this, as the leather thongs or piece connecting the sections for the thumb and forefinger in a baseball glove or mitt.
any material or part formed from interlaced threads, thongs, branches, etc., or having a latticelike appearance, as the face of a tennis racket.
webbings, Chiefly Eastern New England Older Use. the reins or lines for controlling a horse or team of horses.

Origin of webbing

late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50; see origin at web, -ing1

Definition for webbing (2 of 2)

web

[ web ]
/ wɛb /

noun

verb (used with object), webbed, web·bing.

to cover with or as if with a web; envelop.
to ensnare or entrap.

verb (used without object), webbed, web·bing.

to make or form a web.

Origin of web

before 900; Middle English (noun), Old English; cognate with Dutch, Low German webbe, Old Norse vefr; akin to weave
Related formsweb·less, adjectiveweb·like, adjective

Word story

16. See Internet
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for webbing

British Dictionary definitions for webbing (1 of 2)

webbing

/ (ˈwɛbɪŋ) /

noun

a strong fabric of hemp, cotton, jute, etc, woven in strips and used under springs in upholstery or for straps, etc
the skin that unites the digits of a webbed foot
anything that forms a web

British Dictionary definitions for webbing (2 of 2)

web

/ (wɛb) /

noun

verb webs, webbing or webbed

Derived Formswebless, adjectiveweblike, adjective

Word Origin for web

Old English webb; related to Old Saxon, Old High German webbi, Old Norse vefr
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for webbing

web


n.

Old English webb "woven fabric," from Proto-Germanic *wabjam "fabric, web" (cf. Old Saxon webbi, Old Norse vefr, Dutch webbe, Old High German weppi, German gewebe "web"), from PIE *webh- "to weave" (see weave (v.)).

Meaning "spider's web" is first recorded early 13c. Applied to the membranes between the toes of ducks and other aquatic birds from 1570s. Internet sense is from 1992, shortened from World Wide Web (1990). Web browser, web page both also attested 1990.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for webbing (1 of 2)

webbing

[ wĕbĭng ]

n.

A congenital condition in which adjacent structures or parts are joined by a broad band of tissue that is not normally present to such a degree.

Medicine definitions for webbing (2 of 2)

web

[ wĕb ]

n.

A membrane or fold of skin connecting the toes, as of certain mammals.
A structure of delicate, threadlike filaments characteristically spun by spiders.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for webbing

web

[ wĕb ]

A structure of fine, elastic, threadlike filaments characteristically spun by spiders to catch insect prey. The larvae of certain insects also weave webs that serve as protective shelters for feeding and may include leaves or other plant parts.
A membrane or fold of skin connecting the toes in certain animals, especially ones that swim, such as water birds and otters. The web improves the ability of the foot to push against water.
also Web The World Wide Web.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for webbing

Web


See Internet.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.