wharf

[ hwawrf, wawrf ]
/ ʰwɔrf, wɔrf /

noun, plural wharves [hwawrvz, wawrvz] /ʰwɔrvz, wɔrvz/, wharfs.

a structure built on the shore of or projecting into a harbor, stream, etc., so that vessels may be moored alongside to load or unload or to lie at rest; quay; pier.
Obsolete.
  1. a riverbank.
  2. the shore of the sea.

verb (used with object)

to provide with a wharf or wharves.
to place or store on a wharf: The schedule allowed little time to wharf the cargo.
to accommodate at or bring to a wharf: The new structure will wharf several vessels.

verb (used without object)

to tie up at a wharf; dock: The ship wharfed in the early morning.

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Origin of wharf

before 1050; Middle English (noun); Old English hwearf embankment; cognate with Middle Low German warf; akin to German Werf pier

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH wharf

dock harbor pier wharf
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for wharf

British Dictionary definitions for wharf

wharf
/ (wɔːf) /

noun plural wharves (wɔːvz) or wharfs

a platform of timber, stone, concrete, etc, built parallel to the waterfront at a harbour or navigable river for the docking, loading, and unloading of ships
the wharves NZ the working area of a dock
an obsolete word for shore 1

verb (tr)

to moor or dock at a wharf
to provide or equip with a wharf or wharves
to store or unload on a wharf

Word Origin for wharf

Old English hwearf heap; related to Old Saxon hwarf, Old High German hwarb a turn, Old Norse hvarf circle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012