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View synonyms for whittle

whittle

1

[ hwit-l, wit-l ]

verb (used with object)

, whit·tled, whit·tling.
  1. to cut, trim, or shape (a stick, piece of wood, etc.) by carving off bits with a knife.
  2. to form by whittling:

    to whittle a figure.

  3. to cut off (a bit).
  4. to reduce the amount of, as if by whittling; pare down; take away by degrees (usually followed by down, away, etc.):

    to whittle down the company's overhead; to whittle away one's inheritance.



verb (used without object)

, whit·tled, whit·tling.
  1. to whittle wood or the like with a knife, as in shaping something or as a mere aimless diversion:

    to spend an afternoon whittling.

  2. to tire oneself or another by worrying or fussing.

noun

  1. British Dialect. a knife, especially a large one, as a carving knife or a butcher knife.

Whittle

2

[ hwit-l, wit-l ]

noun

  1. Sir Frank, 1907–96, English engineer and inventor.

Whittle

1

/ ˈwɪtəl /

noun

  1. WhittleSir Frank19071996MEnglishTECHNOLOGY: engineerTECHNOLOGY: inventor Sir Frank. 1907–96, English engineer, who invented the jet engine for aircraft; flew first British jet aircraft (1941)


whittle

2

/ ˈwɪtəl /

verb

  1. to cut or shave strips or pieces from (wood, a stick, etc), esp with a knife
  2. tr to make or shape by paring or shaving
  3. tr; often foll by away, down, off, etc to reduce, destroy, or wear away gradually
  4. dialect.
    intr to complain or worry about something continually

noun

  1. dialect.
    a knife, esp a large one

Whittle

/ wĭtl /

  1. British aeronautical engineer and inventor who developed the first aircraft engine powered by jet propulsion in 1937.


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Derived Forms

  • ˈwhittler, noun

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Other Words From

  • whittler noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of whittle1

1375–1425; late Middle English (noun), dialectal variant of thwitel knife, Old English thwīt ( an ) to cut + -el -le

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Word History and Origins

Origin of whittle1

C16: variant of C15 thwittle large knife, from Old English thwitel, from thwītan to cut; related to Old Norse thveitr cut, thveita to beat

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Example Sentences

Neither Cipriani nor Whittle responded to requests for comment.

In spite of his new entrepreneurial vision, Whittle maintains his good feelings towards the Pacha owners.

In fact, Bomba almost turned into a nightmare for the Cipriani-Whittle duo.

How did you whittle all that material into the final shape of the film?

And as Bill Whittle put it, “Republicans should commit to their own story.”

Wal, Capm, fust thing is to fish up a bit 'f driftwood 'n' whittle out 'nother paddle.

He'd sit with his cigar tilted up in one corner of his mouth, and his hat tilted forward, and whittle sticks.

Anyone can whittle these little sticks out, using any kind of hard wood.

The other picked up a pine splinter from the wharf, and producing a knife, began to whittle it.

Lawyer Whittle was fined two pecks of apples and cigars for wearing a stovepipe hat and so the fun went on, day after day.

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