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View synonyms for wicket

wicket

[ wik-it ]

noun

  1. a window or opening, often closed by a grating or the like, as in a door, or forming a place of communication in a ticket office, a teller's cage in a bank, etc.
  2. Croquet. a hoop or arch.
  3. a turnstile in an entrance.
  4. a small door or gate, especially one beside, or forming part of, a larger one.
  5. a small gate by which a canal lock is emptied.
  6. a gate by which a flow of water is regulated, as to a waterwheel.
  7. Cricket.
    1. either of the two frameworks, each consisting of three stumps with two bails in grooves across the tops, at which the bowler aims the ball.
    2. the area between these frameworks; the playing field.
    3. one batsman's turn at the wicket.
    4. the period during which two players bat together.
    5. a batsman's innings that is not completed or not begun.


wicket

/ ˈwɪkɪt /

noun

  1. a small door or gate, esp one that is near to or part of a larger one
  2. a small window or opening in a door, esp one fitted with a grating or glass pane, used as a means of communication in a ticket office, bank, etc
  3. a small sluicegate, esp one in a canal lock gate or by a water wheel
  4. a croquet hoop
    1. cricket either of two constructions, placed 22 yards apart, consisting of three pointed stumps stuck parallel in the ground with two wooden bails resting on top, at which the batsman stands
    2. the strip of ground between these
    3. a batsman's turn at batting or the period during which two batsmen bat

      a third-wicket partnership

    4. the act or instance of a batsman being got out

      the bowler took six wickets

  5. keep wicket
    keep wicket to act as a wicketkeeper
  6. on a sticky wicket informal.
    on a sticky wicket in an awkward situation


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Other Words From

  • half-wicket noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of wicket1

First recorded in 1200–50; Middle English wiket, from Anglo-French; Old French guischet, from Germanic; compare Middle Dutch wiket “wicket,” equivalent to wik- (akin to Old English wīcan “to yield”; weak ) + -et, noun suffix

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Word History and Origins

Origin of wicket1

C18: from Old Northern French wiket; related to Old Norse vikja to move

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Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. to be on / have / bat a sticky wicket, British Slang. to be at or have a disadvantage.

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Example Sentences

Over the past three seasons of the English County Championship, no cricketer has taken more wickets than Essex off spinner Simon Harmer.

From Ozy

It looked into a garden, whence a wicket-gate opened into a small paddock; all beyond was fine meadow-land and wood.

Those whose hoops had been knocked down assembled on one side, close to the side wicket.

The gate itself, closed by enormous locks, had a wicket through which to examine those who asked admittance.

The conversation generally turned upon his old “missus,” who was buried under a yew tree, near the wicket gate.

The Disagreeable Woman's house is at the end of the row, and across the road is a wicket-gate leading—Where did it lead?

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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