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View synonyms for wiener

wiener

1

[ wee-ner ]

Wiener

2

[ wee-ner ]

noun

  1. Norbert, 1894–1964, U.S. mathematician: pioneer in cybernetics.

wiener

1

/ ˈwiːnəˌwɜːst; ˈwiːnə /

noun

  1. a kind of smoked beef or pork sausage, similar to a frankfurter Also calledwienieweenieˈwiːnɪ


Wiener

2

/ ˈwiːnə /

noun

  1. WienerNorbert18941964MUSSCIENCE: mathematician Norbert (ˈnɔːbət). 1894–1964, US mathematician, who developed the concept of cybernetics

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Word History and Origins

Origin of wiener1

1865–70, Americanism; < German, short for Wiener Wurst Viennese sausage

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Word History and Origins

Origin of wiener1

C20: shortened from German Wiener Wurst Viennese sausage

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Example Sentences

Paul is a fantastic person and I’m rooting for his recovery, said Senator Wiener.

“Unfortunately, because our federal government failed to act quickly to acquire the vaccine supplies needed to prevent an outbreak, we are now in a public health emergency that is only going to escalate,” said Wiener, the California lawmaker.

From Axios

In his explanation, Wiener said the incumbents had recklessly disregarded student learning loss during the pandemic and had clumsily focused on renaming schools rather than reopening them.

Wiener authored and passed SB 219 in 2017, and then-Governor Jerry Brown signed the bill into law.

There was a discount on the 5-month-old wiener dog, who was wearing a pink bow and whose head was covered in little bumps from constantly whacking it against the water bottle in her cage.

From Time

The Wiener Montags Journal complained, "Vienna has no nightlife, the Viennese are asleep by ten."

An Oregon judge was forced to answer that question this week in a fight over an obese wiener dog named Obie.

And Wiener announced on Thursday her intent to take a “little twit-cation.”

This was not the light-hearted lawmaker of last week, making wiener jokes at his own expense.

Sondra Wiener, forced to make pocket money like an out-of-work laborer, endures the pity of her neighbors.

One thing bearing directly upon this point may be read in the Wiener Zeitung of July 2, 1788.

Artaria, who published the work, advertised it in the Wiener Zeitung of February 8th, 1797.

Well, I've read Wiener's books, and studied Shannon's work, too.

I have already made a less precise allusion to them, notably in the Wiener Rundschau, May 1899.

And the supper that night of Wiener schnitzel and pfannekuchen was certainly good, and hot, and plentiful beyond belief.

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About This Word

What does wiener mean?

A wiener is a type of sausage. Wiener is also used as slang for “penis” and as a mild insult for someone seen as weak and awkward.

Where does wiener come from?

The word wiener, often misspelled as weiner, entered English around 1865–70, shortened from the German phrase Wiener Wurst, which roughly translates to “Vienna sausage.” Wiener literally means “of Vienna” and is pronounced like [ vee-nuh ]  in German. There is some debate about whether the sausages were invented in Vienna, Austria, or in Frankfurt, Germany, but it’s generally agreed that they traveled to the United States with German immigrants. Hot dogs are sometimes called wieners or weiner dogs today, and in Rhode Island, they are referred to as hot wieners.

Due to their phallic appearance, it didn’t take long for the word wiener to become a slang reference to the penis. By the early 1900s, when hot dogs had become a popular food in the U.S., English speakers were already using wiener as a euphemistic or childish slang term for the penis.

As a slang term, it can also be used as an insult for someone, usually a young man, seen as wimpy and awkward—like the slang dork.

The dachshund breed of dogs are often called wiener dogs due to their sausagelike shape. Similarly, hot dogs themselves are sometimes called dachshund sandwiches.

How is wiener used in real life?

Some adults (especially parents) and children will use wiener in speech and writing as a euphemistic substitute for the penis.

Calling a person a wiener or weenie (i.e., a wimp or dork) can be considered mildly offensive. Calling a hotdog a wiener, while it still has some currency, may cause some confusion—or snickers. Dachshunds, however, commonly go by wiener dog; a 2016 film about the breed was even titled this.

Keep in mind that Wiener (and Weiner) are also common surnames.

More examples of wiener:

“’Please tell me you don’t already have a little wiener,’ she says as she hands him a small hot dog, stunning him into momentary silence.”

—Tia (The Bachelor contestant), quoted by Lauren Piester, December 2017

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