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zooid

[ zoh-oid ]
/ ˈzoʊ ɔɪd /
Biology
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noun
any organic body or cell capable of spontaneous movement and of an existence more or less apart from or independent of the parent organism.
any animal organism or individual capable of separate existence, and produced by fission, gemmation, or some method other than direct sexual reproduction.
any one of the recognizably distinct individuals or elements of a compound or colonial animallike organism, whether or not detached or detachable.
adjective
Also zo·oi·dal. pertaining to, resembling, or of the nature of an animal.
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Origin of zooid

First recorded in 1850–55; zo- + -oid
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use zooid in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for zooid

zooid
/ (ˈzəʊɔɪd) /

noun
any independent animal body, such as an individual of a coelenterate colony
a motile cell or body, such as a gamete, produced by an organism

Derived forms of zooid

zooidal, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for zooid

zooid
[ zōoid′ ]

n.
An organic cell or organized body that has independent movement within a living organism, especially a motile gamete such as a spermatozoon.
An independent animallike organism produced asexually, as by budding or fission.
One of the distinct individuals forming a colonial animal such as a coral.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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