Archives

  1. “Democrat” vs. “Republican”: Where Did The Parties Get Their Names?

    In the United States, the words Democrat and Republican are widely used to mean the two major American political parties: the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. We often hear these words used to describe things the parties do or the people connected to them. For example, former Vice President Joe Biden is the Democratic candidate for president, and members of the Republican Party are …

  2. Where Did The Acronyms POTUS And FLOTUS Come From?

    The faster we move, the more abbreviations and acronyms we use, and when it comes to talking about the folks who reside at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue—otherwise known as the White House—there are plenty of acronyms to choose from. The White House has always been home to POTUS (President of the United States). As we have yet to have a female or gay president, if the …

  3. English Words That Came From Hindi And Urdu

    How many words from Hindi and Urdu do you know? Well, if you’re one of the approximately 70 million speakers of Urdu and 425 million of Hindi, then, well, you know a lot—and that’s only counting native speakers. Millions more speak Urdu and Hindi as a second language all around the globe, making them, combined, one of the most spoken languages.  But even if you …

  4. Nazi vs. Fascist: Is There Really A Difference?

    Fascist and Nazi: these two words loom large in the history books and in heated conversations about politics—conversations that have far outlasted the regimes that originally embraced them. For many of us, the words fascist and Nazi bring to mind the worst dictators and crimes against humanity. But as these ideologies make the news in 2020, used especially in the context of a growing concern about …

  5. cancel culture

    Cancel culture refers to the popular practice of withdrawing support for (canceling) public figures and companies after they have done or said something considered objectionable or offensive. Cancel culture is generally discussed as being performed on…
  6. Why Do “Left” And “Right” Mean Liberal And Conservative?

    In election years, the words left and right more often bring to mind the political spectrum than they do directions in space. But, how did liberal politics become associated with the word left, anyways? And why are conservatives labelled as right? You know how we always warn you to be skeptical of origin stories that sound too good to be true? Well, the history of …

  7. When Do You Use “Whom” vs. “Who”?

    Over the last 200 years, the pronoun whom has been on a steady decline. Despite its waning use in speech and ongoing speculation about its imminent extinction, whom still holds a spot in the English language, particularly in formal writing. Understanding when and how to use this pronoun can set your writing apart. If whom is on the decline, then who must be growing in popularity. The two—as …

  8. Absentee Ballot vs. Mail-In Ballot: Is There A Difference?

    As if the coronavirus pandemic wasn’t already challenging enough, the US will be holding a general election in the midst of it. Many people are rightfully concerned that traditional, in-person voting could spread COVID-19, and so some states are changing (or considering changing) their voting rules to make it easier for eligible people to vote by mail. Voting by mail can be done by what’s …

  9. New Words We Created Because Of Coronavirus

  10. What’s The Difference Between “Mistrust” vs. “Distrust”?

    Trust us on this one. There’s only a slight difference between these two. In general, distrust and mistrust are considered synonyms, both based on the word trust (although centuries apart).  As nouns, both words refer to a condition of lacking trust, and are effectively interchangeable. As verbs, well, it’s a bit more complicated, as you’ll see. What’s the origin of trust? The word trust is first …