Archives

  1. dark aqua text "whomever vs whoever" on light aqua background

    “Whomever” vs. “Whoever”: What’s The Difference?

    Whoever you are, you’re not alone in being confused about when you should use whoever and whomever. In this article, we’ll explain the difference between whomever and whoever, cover when and how to use each one, and provide example sentences showing exactly how each one is used. If you haven’t yet, read our guide to who vs. whom first. It provides the foundation for the …

  2. dark green text "affect vs effect" on light green background

    “Affect” vs. “Effect”: Use The Correct Word Every Time

      The words affect and effect are two of the most commonly confused words in the English language. They’re pronounced pretty much the same, used in the same contexts, and both can be used as both a verb and a noun. So how can you remember the difference? In this article, we’ll explain: The difference between affect and effect When to use affect or effect …

  3. From Suffrage To Sisterhood: What Is Feminism And What Does It Mean?

    Held on March 8, International Women’s Day celebrates the progress women have made over the last century, and the inspiring women who helped make that progress happen. From the suffragist movement of the 1800s to the 2017 Women’s March in Washington, women have used the power of language and oration to inspire countless people. Early inspiration: the Enlightenment Early feminism was heavily influenced by the …

  4. Pisces People: These Words Are All About You 

    Just after the last of the Valentine’s Day chocolates have been consumed and the season of Aquarius comes to an end, it’s time for the season of Pisces. Those born between February 19–March 20 are fortunate enough to call themselves Pisces, which is the 12th and final sign of the zodiac. In 2022, the 40 days of Lent start on March 2, well within Pisces …

  5. Illustration of heart that says Be Mine

    What Does It Mean To Ask Someone To Be Your “Valentine”?

    The first records of the word valentine in its modern sense come from the 1400s. Valentines and Valentine’s Day get their name from feast day of Saint Valentine, but there are at least two saints named Valentine, one of whom became a martyr around the year 270 CE. The name Valentine comes from a Latin word meaning “strength.” There are many legends about it, but …

  6. man and woman with masks on and kissing, blue filter

    “Epidemic” vs. “Pandemic” vs. “Endemic”: What Do These Terms Mean?

    COVID-19 has provided a consistent vocabulary lesson in epidemiology. Among the most important distinctions it has highlighted are the differences between the terms epidemic, pandemic, and endemic. These words have major similarities—all three end in -demic and deal with the spread of disease. But there are key differences, including those related to scale and duration. In this article, we’ll sort out the differences and answer …

  7. Where Does The Name “January” Come From?

    Known for recaps and resolutions, each new year often starts with retrospection and … the month of January. But where did the name January come from and can we learn anything about the name of this first month to inspire us to actually keep those New Year’s resolutions intact? January, as we know, is the first month of the year and contains 31 days. The …

  8. What Does “Auld Lang Syne” Actually Mean?

    New Year’s Eve is full of traditions that are easy to understand. Counting down the seconds until the day the calendar changes, for example. Others are a little less straightforward. Case in point: singing “Auld Lang Syne”—or at least humming along while it plays on TV in the background. Don’t blame yourself if you don’t know the lyrics despite the song making the rounds every …

  9. Where Does The Name “Winter” Come From?

    It’s easy to tell when winter is coming in the parts of the world that feel the full force of the four seasons. The leaves have all come and gone from the trees, the air regularly has a distinct bite to it, and people don’t leave the house without their winter caps (and the mountains put on their winter snow caps, too). In the Northern …

  10. What Is Figgy Pudding?

    You know the song. It may start by wishing everyone a merry Christmas, but then the demand starts. “Oh, bring us some figgy pudding…” with its petulant refrain, “We won’t go until we get some.” But do you actually know what figgy pudding is? And why do we sing about it, anyway? While figgy means “containing figs,” and pudding is defined as “a thick, soft …

  11. 12 Names For Santa Claus From Around The World

    There are few figures as recognizable as Santa Claus. His red-cheeked and cheery visage is seen on TV, on posters, and at malls across the United States in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Though his name and image are just about everywhere, do you know why Santa Claus is called by that name—or Saint Nick, Saint Nicholas, Santa, or any of the other similar monikers? …

  12. How The Month Of December Got Its Name

    Ah, December, that time of year when storefronts are festooned with holiday decorations, and another year is reaching its close. If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, December might mean pulling off your boots so you can curl up with your smartphone and read Dictionary.com (hey, we can dream). But, what does the word December mean in the dictionary? And, where did the 12th month of …