• Word of the day
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    Wednesday, September 11, 2019

    epistolary

    adjective [ih-pis-tl-er-ee]
    contained in or carried on by letters: an epistolary friendship.
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    What is the origin of epistolary?

    English epistolary comes from the Latin adjective epistulāris (also epistolāris), a derivative of the noun epistula (epistola) “a letter, a dispatch, a written communication, an epistle (as in the New Testament).” Epistula comes from Greek epistolḗ, which has the same meanings. An epistolary novel is one that is composed in a series of documents, usually (private) letters, but also diary entries, newspaper articles, and other documents. Such novels were especially popular in the 18th century, e.g., in England, Pamela by Samuel Richardson (1740); in France, Dangerous Liaisons by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos (1782); and in Germany, The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1774). Bram Stoker's epistolary novel Dracula, published in 1897, and continuously in print ever since, has attained a kind of immortality. Epistolary entered English in the 17th century.

    How is epistolary used?

    Her imaginative epistolary novel opens with Johanna's engagement to Theo in 1888 and winds its way through the avant-garde Paris art scene .... Sarah Ferguson, "Johanna: A Novel of the van Gogh Family," New York Times, June 4, 1995

    Their disagreement lay dormant for nearly two decades, during which time their epistolary friendship flourished .... Nathan Goldman, "'I Don't Know If This Letter Will Reach You': The Letters of Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem," Los Angeles Review of Books, March 12, 2019

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  • Word of the day
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    Tuesday, September 10, 2019

    slubber

    verb (used with object) [sluhb-er]
    to perform hastily or carelessly.
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    What is the origin of slubber?

    Slubber  is an older, infrequent verb that means “to perform (something) hastily or carelessly.” Earlier senses include “to smear; smudge” and “to sully (a reputation, etc.).” Slubber comes from Low German slubbern “to do work carelessly” and appears to be related to slabber and the more familiar slobber “to let saliva run from the mouth,” with an earlier sense of “to eat in a hasty, messy manner”—an unfastidious trio of terms forming one “sloppy” family. Slubber entered English in the early 1500s.

    How is slubber used?

    Slubber not business for my sake, Bassanio ... William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, 1600

    It must be "slubber'd o'er in haste,"—its important preliminaries left to the cold imagination of the reader—its fine spirit perhaps evaporating for want to being embodied in words. Caroline Kirkland, Western Clearings, 1845

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  • Word of the day
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    Monday, September 09, 2019

    ikebana

    noun [ik-uh-bah-nuh; Japanese ee-ke-bah-nah]
    the Japanese art of arranging flowers.
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    What is the origin of ikebana?

    Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arranging, comes from the Japanese verb ikeru “to keep alive, make alive, arrange” and -bana, a variant used as a combining form of hana “flower.” Ikebana dates to the 6th century when offerings of flowers were placed at altars; later, flowers were also displayed in tokonomas (alcoves in private homes). Ikebana entered English at the beginning of the 20th century.

    How is ikebana used?

    ... were you to consider the philosophy at the core of ikebana, grounded as it is in Japan's ancient polytheism and its Buddhist traditions, you might find something quite relevant to the times we live in: an art that can expand your appreciation  of beauty. Deborah Needleman, "The Rise of Modern Ikebana," New York Times, November 6, 2017

    One must surpass and transcend concepts of traditional use and discover a "new face" in the material, and this "new face" is the primary focus of contemporary ikebana. Shozo Sato, Ikebana: The Art of Arranging Flowers, 2012

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  • Word of the day
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    Sunday, September 08, 2019

    embosom

    verb (used with object) [em-booz-uhm, -boo-zuhm]
    to cherish; foster.
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    What is the origin of embosom?

    The verb embosom “to cherish, foster,” is a compound formed from the prefix em- meaning “to make (someone or something) be in (a place or condition),” a borrowing from Old French, from Latin in-, and the noun bosom (the variant imbosom is formed directly from the Latin prefix in-). Bosom comes from Old English bósm and has certain relatives only within Germanic, e.g., Old Frisian bósm, Old Saxon bósom, Old High German buosam, German Busen. The verb is poetic and rare, first appearing in Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene (1590).

    How is embosom used?

    The more thoroughly she is recognized in any University, and made to embosom the minds trained in it, interpenetrating with her Divine force all resources of Science, the more will she make that, in no common-place sense but truly, royally, the cherished mother of its students. "The True Success of Human Life," The New Englander, No. 41, February 1853

    When the act of reflection takes place in the mind, when we look at ourselves in the light of thought, we discover that our life is embosomed in beauty. Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Spiritual Laws," Essays, 1841

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  • Word of the day
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    Saturday, September 07, 2019

    rarefied

    adjective [rair-uh-fahyd]
    extremely high or elevated; lofty; exalted: the rarefied atmosphere of a scholarly symposium.
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    What is the origin of rarefied?

    The adjective rarefied “elevated, lofty, exalted,” only first appears in this sense in English in the second half of the 17th century. In origin, rarefied is the past participle of the Middle English verb rarefien “to reduce the density of, thin, soften,” first recorded at the end of the 14th century. Rarefien comes from Old French rarefier, from Medieval Latin rārēficāre, from Latin rārēfacere “to make less solid, rarefy,” a Latin technical term occurring first and only in Lucretius’s Dē Rērum Nātūrā, a long Epicurean didactic poem aimed at freeing human beings from the scourge of superstition, religion, and the fear of death.

    How is rarefied used?

    The country gentry of old time lived in a rarefied social air: dotted apart on their stations up the mountain they looked down with imperfect discrimination on the belts of thicker life below. George Eliot, Middlemarch, 1872

    In his 30s, breathing rarefied air, Mr. Coppola made two decisions that changed his career’s trajectory. R. T. Watson, "Francis Ford Coppola's New Visions," Wall Street Journal, August 16, 2019

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  • Word of the day
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    Friday, September 06, 2019

    chirography

    noun [kahy-rog-ruh-fee]
    handwriting; penmanship.
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    What is the origin of chirography?

    Chirography, an expensive word for “handwriting, penmanship,” comes from Greek cheirogaphía “written report, testimony in writing.” The first element, cheiro-, is a combining form of the noun cheír “hand,” which has many dialect forms (chérs, chḗr, chérr-). Cheír comes from the uncommon Proto-Indo-European root ghesor-, ghesr- “hand,” the source of Hittite kessar, Armenian jeṙ-, and Tocharian tsar, all meaning “hand.” The combining form -graphy, naturalized in English, is a derivative of the verb gráphein “to write,” from a Proto-Indo-European root ghrebh-, ghrobh- “to scratch, dig, bury,” the source of English grave (burial place), grub (to dig), and groove. Chirography entered English in the 17th century.

    How is chirography used?

    Miss Kate S. Chittenden's hand is bold, fearless, and masculine, and there are decided indications that her temperament resembles her chirography in these respects. "Character in Writing," New York Times February 22, 1891

    “Three hours of hand-shaking is not calculated to improve a man’s chirography,” he [Lincoln] said later that evening. Louis P. Masur, Lincoln's Hundred Days, 2012

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  • Word of the day
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    Thursday, September 05, 2019

    magnanimous

    adjective [mag-nan-uh-muhs]
    generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be magnanimous toward one's enemies.
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    What is the origin of magnanimous?

    Magnanimous comes from the Latin adjective magnanimus “noble in spirit, brave, generous.” Magnanimus is a loan translation of the Greek adjectives megáthymos, megalóthymos “great hearted,” and megalópsychos “generous, high-souled.” Magnanimus was used especially in translations of the Aristotelian term megalópsychos. Magnanimous entered English in the 16th century.

    How is magnanimous used?

    ... if he would ... discharge his heart of its hoarded bitterness—forgive the world, for having turned his head; and for not keeping it turned, by main force; become a little more magnanimous; and, a little less unhappy and suspicious ... I do almost believe that he might do something decent, to be remembered by. John Neal, Randolph, 1823

    As a master of symbolism, Mandela supported his strategy by being magnanimous towards his former enemies. Paul Schoemaker, "The 3 Decisions That Made Mandela a Truly Great Leader," Inc., July 28, 2013

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