Word of the Day

Word of the day

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

longevous

[ lon-jee-vuhs, lawn- ]

adjective

Archaic.

long-lived; living to a great age.

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What is the origin of longevous?

The adjective longevous is much less common than its derivative noun longevity. Longevous derives from the Latin adjective longaevus “of great age, ancient,” a compound of the adjective longus “long” and the noun aevum “time, the past, the ages.” Longevity comes from Late Latin longaevitās (stem longaevitāt-) “long life, longevity,” formed from longus and the noun aevitās (also aetās) “age, one’s age,” a derivative of aevum. Longevous entered English in the mid-17th century (and longevity in the second half of the 16th century).

how is longevous used?

a vast majority of these extremely longevous folk were of a placid temperament, not given to worry.

Raymond Pearl, "The Search for Longevity," The Scientific Monthly, Vol. 46, May 1938  

It’s hard to remember a longevous rock band that left on such a high note as these women did in 2006.

Chris Riemenschneider, "Sleater-Kinney returns to a city full of love," Star Tribune, February 15, 2015

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Word of the day

Monday, March 23, 2020

schlep

[ shlep ]

verb (used with object)

to carry; lug: to schlep an umbrella on a sunny day.

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What is the origin of schlep?

The slang term schlep “to lug, carry” is used mostly in the United States. Schlep is from the Yiddish verb shlepn “to pull, drag” (German schleppen “to draw, tug, haul”). The derivative noun schlepper, “one who schleps,” appears slightly earlier than the verb. Schlepper entered English toward the end of the 19th century; schlep appeared in the early 20th.

how is schlep used?

She had drawn notice as the doctor who would help mechanics schlep gear, fetch coffee and even massage the overworked massage therapists.

Nancy Lofholm, "Crested Butte surgeon scores top spot at Sochi Olympics," Denver Post, January 11, 2014

After a bit of trial and error, you’ll find car-free travel is a liberating choice that forces you to schlep considerably less.

Lauren Matison, "How to Travel Car-Free With a Family," New York Times, December 4, 2019

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Word of the day

Sunday, March 22, 2020

hypermnesia

[ hahy-perm-nee-zhuh ]

noun

the condition of having an unusually vivid or precise memory.

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What is the origin of hypermnesia?

Hypermnesia, a medical or psychological term meaning “the condition of having an unusually vivid or precise memory,” is composed of the familiar prefix hyper-, which usually implies excess or exaggeration, the Greek noun mnêsis “memory,” and the Greek abstract noun suffix –ia. Hypermnesia entered English in the late 19th century.

how is hypermnesia used?

Psychologists have investigated some persons with exceptional memories – said to exhibit “hypermnesia”. The most famous of these was a Russian, code-named “S”, who could recall long random series of numbers or words without error, many years later.

Alun Rees, "If only I could remember her name," New Scientist, December 24, 1994

This sharpened memory is called hypermnesia. A frequent experience in dreaming is a hypermnesia with regard to childhood scenes.

Frederick Peterson, "The New Divination of Dreams," Harper's Magazine, Vol. 115, June 1907

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