Word of the Day

Word of the day

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

plethoric

[ ple-thawr-ik, -thor-, pleth-uh-rik ]

adjective

overfull; turgid; inflated: a plethoric, pompous speech.

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What is the origin of plethoric?

The rare adjective plethoric means “overfull, inflated; marked by plethora (a morbid condition due to an excess of red blood cells).” And just as plethora does not mean “abundance” but “overabundance,” so plethoric means “overabundant.” Plethoric comes via the Late Latin medical term plēthōricus, plētōricus, from Greek plēthōrikós “plethoric,” a derivative of the noun plēthōra “fullness, satiety, excess of blood or another humor.” Plethoric in its medical sense entered English at the end of the 14th century; its extended sense “inflated, turgid, excessive” in the 17th.

how is plethoric used?

… my very astute friend Daniels pulled out a plethoric purse and began to display the marked gold with which it was plentifully supplied.

W. W. (Mary Fortune), "The Detectives Album," The Australian Journal, February 1882

The “blue book,” he says, “creates an atmosphere of formality and redundancy in which the drab, Latinate, plethoric, euphemistic style of law reviews and judicial opinions flourishes ….”

Tom Goldstein, "Drive for Plain English Gains Among Lawyers," New York Times, February 19, 1988
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Monday, February 17, 2020

Lincolnesque

[ ling-kuh-nesk ]

adjective

like or characteristic of Abraham Lincoln: a Lincolnesque compassion.

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What is the origin of Lincolnesque?

The uncommon adjective Lincolnesque can be used to refer to President Lincoln’s physical features, in particular his homely face with its deep furrows and his beard, or to qualities of his character and intellect. The adjectival suffix –esque “in the style or manner of” comes from French, from Italian –esco, from Vulgar Latin –iscus. The suffix –iscus is a borrowing from Germanic –iska-, source of German –isch, English –ish, and akin to Slavic –ski (-sky). The proper name Lincoln comes from the city of Lincoln, the county seat of Lincolnshire, England. The Latin name for the city is Lindum Colonia, from the Celtic noun lindo “pool, lake” (Welsh llyn); Colonia here means specifically a retirement community for veterans (in this case the Legio IX Hispana “9th Legion—Spanish,” which was stationed in the area from a.d. 43 on). Lincolnesque entered English in the first half of the 20th century.

how is Lincolnesque used?

… Captain America, the embodiment of a kind of Lincolnesque optimism, poses a direct question for me: Why would anyone believe in The Dream?

Ta-Nehisi Coates, "Why I'm Writing Captain America," The Atlantic, February 28, 2018

Given Mr. Obama’s particular fondness for Lincolnesque oratory, it’s surprising that he hasn’t adopted one of Lincoln’s favorite habits: quoting Shakespeare.

Barry Edelstein, "Shakespeare for Presidents," New York Times, April 25, 2009
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Sunday, February 16, 2020

soniferous

[ suh-nif-er-uhs, soh- ]

adjective

conveying or producing sound.

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What is the origin of soniferous?

The adjective soniferous “conveying or producing sound” is Latinate but not Latin. The first two syllables, soni-, are a combining form of the Latin noun sonus “sound.” The second two syllables, –ferous “bearing, producing,” make a hybrid suffix from the Latin suffix –fer “carrying, bearing” (as in aquifer) and the English suffix –ous “possessing, full of,” which comes via Old French –ous, –eus, –eux from Latin –ōsus. Soniferous entered English in the early 18th century.

how is soniferous used?

Since World War II biologists have learned much more about the characteristic sounds of many soniferous marine animals.

P. Vigoureux and J. B. Hersey, "Sound in the Sea," The Global Coastal Ocean, 1962

There is even an entire family of fishes, the Haemulidae or “grunts,” whose common name reflects their soniferous tendencies.

Christie Wilcox, "I am Lionfish, hear me ROAR!" Discover, May 12, 2017
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