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Word of the Day
Tuesday, October 09, 2018

Definitions for ineluctable

  1. incapable of being evaded; inescapable: an ineluctable destiny.

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Citations for ineluctable
The coming of a new day brought a sharper consciousness of ineluctable reality, and with it a sense of the need of action. Edith Wharton, Summer, 1917
My world, on the contrary, has been thrown into extreme ethical confusion by my ineluctable connection with the crimes of Tsardom, forced on me by my birth into a family belonging to the minor nobility. Rebecca West, The Birds Fall Down, 1966
Origin of ineluctable
1615-1625
“Proteus,” the third episode of Ulysses, opens with the beautiful but opaque “Ineluctable modality of the visible: at least that if no more, thought through my eyes.” At least the word ineluctable is easy to analyze, if not the entire sentence. Ineluctable comes directly from Latin inēluctābilis “from which one cannot escape,” which consists of the negative or privative prefix in-, roughly “not” (from the same Proto-Indo-European source as English un-). Ēluctārī is a compound verb meaning “to force one’s way out”; it is formed from the prefix ē-, a form of the preposition and prefix ex, ex- “out of, from within” used only before consonants, and luctārī “to wrestle”; the suffix -bilis is added to verbs and denotes ability. Ineluctable entered English in the 17th century.
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