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ad

1

[ ad ]

noun

  1. advertising:

    an ad agency.



-ad

2
  1. a suffix occurring in loanwords from Greek denoting a group or unit comprising a certain number, sometimes of years: dyad; triad .
  2. a suffix meaning “derived from,” “related to,” “concerned with,” “associated with” ( oread ), introduced in loanwords from Greek ( Olympiad; oread ), used sporadically in imitation of Greek models, as Dunciad , after Iliad .

a.d.

3
or A.D.

abbreviation for

  1. in the year of the Lord; since Christ was born:

    Charlemagne was born in a.d. 742.

ad

4

[ ad ]

noun

, Tennis.
  1. ad in, the advantage being scored by the server.
  2. ad out, the advantage being scored by the receiver.

-ad

5
  1. variant of -ade 1: ballad .

a.d.

6

abbreviation for

  1. before the day.

ad

7

[ ad ]

preposition

  1. (in prescriptions) to; up to.

-ad

8
  1. Anatomy, Zoology. a suffix forming adverbs from nouns signifying parts of the body, denoting a direction toward that part: dextrad; dorsad; mediad .

a.d.

9

abbreviation for

  1. after date.
  2. autograph document.

ad-

10
  1. a prefix occurring in loanwords from Latin, where it meant “toward” and indicated direction, tendency, or addition: adjoin . Usually assimilated to the following consonant; a- 5, ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an- 2, ap- 1, ar-, as-, at-.

ad.

11

abbreviation for

  1. adverb.
  2. advertisement.

A.D.

12

abbreviation for

  1. assistant director.
  2. athletic director.
  3. average deviation.

ad

1

the internet domain name for

  1. Andorra


-ad

2

suffix forming adverbs

  1. denoting direction towards a specified part in anatomical descriptions

    cephalad

AD

3

abbreviation for

  1. See BC
    indicating years numbered from the supposed year of the birth of Christ anno Domini Compare BC

    70 ad

  2. military active duty
  3. military air defence
  4. Dame of the Order of Australia

ad-

4

prefix

  1. to; towards

    adverb

    adsorb

  2. near; next to

    adrenal

ad

5

/ æd /

noun

  1. short for advantage Brit equivalentvan

ad

6

/ æd /

noun

  1. short for advertisement

-ad

7

suffix forming nouns

  1. a group or unit (having so many parts or members)

    triad

  2. an epic poem concerning (the subject indicated by the stem)

    Dunciad

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Usage Note

Because anno Domini means “in the year of the Lord,” its abbreviation a.d. was originally placed before rather than after a date: The Roman conquest of Britain began in a.d. 43 (or began a.d. 43). In edited writing, it is still usually placed before the date. But, by analogy with the position of b.c. “before Christ,” which always appears after a date ( Caesar was assassinated in 44 b.c. ), a.d. is also frequently found after the date in all types of writing, including historical works: The Roman emperor Claudius I lived from 10 b.c. to 54 a.d. Despite its literal meaning, a.d. is also used to designate centuries, being placed after the specified century: the second century a.d.

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Usage

In strict usage, ad is only employed with specific years: he died in 1621 ad , but he died in the 17th century (and not the 17th century ad ). Formerly the practice was to write ad preceding the date ( ad 1621 ), and it is also strictly correct to omit in when ad is used, since this is already contained in the meaning of the Latin anno Domini (in the year of Our Lord), but this is no longer general practice. bc is used with both specific dates and indications of the period: Heraclitus was born about 540 bc ; the battle took place in the 4th century bc

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Word History and Origins

Origin of ad1

First recorded in 1795–1800; by shortening

Origin of ad2

Greek -ad- (stem of -as ), specialization of feminine adjective-forming suffix, often used substantively

Origin of ad3

From Latin annō Dominī

Origin of ad4

First recorded in 1915–20; by shortening

Origin of ad5

From Latin ante diem

Origin of ad6

From Latin

Origin of ad7

From the Latin word ad toward, anomalously suffixed to the noun; introduced as a suffix by Scottish anatomist John Barclay (1758–1826) in 1803

Origin of ad8

< Latin ad, ad- (preposition and prefix) to, toward, at, about; cognate with at 1

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Word History and Origins

Origin of ad1

from Latin ad to, towards

Origin of ad2

(sense 4) Latin: in the year of the Lord

Origin of ad3

from Latin: to, towards. As a prefix in words of Latin origin, ad- became ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-, acq-, ar-, as-, and at- before c, f, g, l, n, q, r, s, and t, and became a- before gn, sc, sp, st

Origin of ad4

via Latin from Greek -ad- (plural -ades ), originally forming adjectives; names of epic poems are all formed on the model of the Iliad

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Example Sentences

A lot of the culture around movies in the sci-fi/fantasy genre is about deconstructing them ad nauseam.

Yes, publicizing tragedy gets clicks, gets ad revenue, gets notoriety, and can be done for all the wrong reasons.

When it came to Android, however, it was ad-supported but free.

Late former governors of NY, TX starred in a 1994 snack chip ad.

But an ad-supported version of Desert Golfing was impossible.

"I supposed you 'adn't, as 'e ain't 'ere, with yer ma," replied the young person.

Postrem quid nobis effectum hactenus, seu potis quid attentatum sit ad diuinam gloriam.

Cert ante hoc tempus vix vnquam Gallis vacatum fuit conuertdis incolarum ad Christum animis.

I don't blame him for killin' the cuss, not a bit; I'd have shot any man livin' that 'ad taken a good horse o' mine up that trail.

In hoc Isthmo portus regalis est, vbi nunc degimus, ad gradum latitudinis quadragesimum quartum cum besse.

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