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Idioms about head

Origin of head

First recorded before 900; Middle English he(v)ed, Old English hēafod; cognate with Old High German houbit, Gothic haubith; akin to Old English hafud- (in hafudland “headland”), Old Norse hǫfuth, Latin caput (see capital1)

OTHER WORDS FROM head

head·like, adjectivemul·ti·head, noun

Other definitions for head (2 of 3)

Head
[ hed ]
/ hɛd /

noun
Edith, 1897–1981, U.S. costume designer.

Other definitions for head (3 of 3)

-head

a native English suffix meaning “state of being” (godhead; maidenhead), occurring in words now mostly archaic or obsolete, many being superseded by forms in -hood.

Origin of -head

Middle English -hede,Old English *-hǣdu, feminine of -hād-hood
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

WORDS THAT USE -HEAD

What does -head mean?

The suffix -head has two distinct senses.

The first of these senses is “a state of being.” It is used rarely, typically in archaic or obscure terms.

The suffix -head comes from Old English -hǣdu, roughly meaning “manner.”

Many terms, such as barehead, use the second sense of -head: literally, “head,” as in the part of the body. This usage is particularly found in insults, such as knucklehead.

What are variants of -head?

While not technically a variant of -head, the related suffix -hood, as in childhood, is more commonly used and similarly denotes a state of being.

Examples of -head meaning "a state of being"

One example of a term that features the suffix -head to mean “a state of being” is godhead, or godhood, meaning “divinity.” Godhead comes from Middle English godhede, which uses the equivalent of -head in that language.

The god- part of the word means “god,” while the suffix -head here denotes “a state of being.” Godhead literally means “state of being godly.”

What are some words that use the suffix -head to denote “state of being”?

What are some other forms that -head may be commonly confused with?

Break it down!

With the sense of -head as “a state of being,” what is the meaning of the archaic noun lowlihead?

Examples of -head meaning "head"

One example of a term that features the suffix -head to mean “head” is redhead, meaning “a person with red hair.”

What are some words that use -head to mean “head”?

Break it down!

With the meaning of -head to mean “head,” what does the insult blockhead mean?

How to use head in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for head (1 of 3)

head
/ (hɛd) /

noun
verb
See also head for, head off, heads

Derived forms of head

headlike, adjective

Word Origin for head

Old English hēafod; related to Old Norse haufuth, Old Frisian hāved, Old Saxon hōbid, Old High German houbit

British Dictionary definitions for head (2 of 3)

Head
/ (hɛd) /

noun
Edith. 1907–81, US dress designer: won many Oscars for her Hollywood film costume designs

British Dictionary definitions for head (3 of 3)

-head

combining form
indicating a person having a preoccupation as specifiedbreadhead
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for head

head
[ hĕd ]

n.
The uppermost or forwardmost part of the human body, containing the brain and the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, and jaws.
The analogous part of various vertebrate and invertebrate animals.
The pus-containing tip of an abscess, boil, or pimple.
The rounded proximal end of a long bone.
The end of a muscle that is attached to the less movable part of the skeleton.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Other Idioms and Phrases with head

head

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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