hood

1
[ hoo d ]
/ hʊd /

noun

verb (used with object)

to furnish with a hood.
to cover with or as if with a hood.

Nearby words

  1. hoo-ha,
  2. hooch,
  3. hooch, pieter de,
  4. hoochinoo,
  5. hoochy koochy,
  6. hood molding,
  7. hood mould,
  8. hood rat,
  9. hood, john bell,
  10. hood, mount

Origin of hood

1
before 900; 1925–30, Americanism for def 3; Middle English hode, Old English hōd; cognate with Old Frisian hōde, Dutch hoed, German Hut hat

Related formshood·less, adjectivehood·like, adjective

hood

2
[ hoo d, hood ]
/ hʊd, hud /

noun Slang.

a hoodlum.

Origin of hood

2
First recorded in 1925–30; by shortening

Hood

[ hoo d ]
/ hʊd /

noun

John Bell,1831–79, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War.
Raymond Math·ew·son [math-yoo-suh n] /ˈmæθ yu sən/, 1881–1934, U.S. architect.
Robin. Robin Hood.
Thomas,1799–1845, English poet and humorist.
Mount, a volcanic peak in N Oregon, in the Cascade Range. 11,253 feet (3430 meters).

'hood

[ hoo d ]
/ hʊd /

noun

Slang. neighborhood.

Origin of 'hood

First recorded in 1985–90; by shortening

-hood

a native English suffix denoting state, condition, character, nature, etc., or a body of persons of a particular character or class, formerly used in the formation of nouns: childhood; likelihood; knighthood; priesthood.

Origin of -hood

Middle English -hode, -hod, Old English -hād (cognate with German -heit), special use of hād condition, state, order, quality, rank

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hood


British Dictionary definitions for hood

hood

1
/ (hʊd) /

noun

verb

(tr) to cover or provide with or as if with a hood
Derived Formshoodless, adjectivehoodlike, adjective

Word Origin for hood

Old English hōd; related to Old High German huot hat, Middle Dutch hoet, Latin cassis helmet; see hat

noun

slang short for hoodlum (def. 1)

Hood

/ (hʊd) /

noun

Robin See Robin Hood
Samuel, 1st Viscount. 1724–1816, British admiral. He fought successfully against the French during the American Revolution and the French Revolutionary Wars
Thomas. 1799–1845, British poet and humorist: his work includes protest poetry, such as The Song of the Shirt (1843) and The Bridge of Sighs (1844)

'hood

/ (hʊd) /

noun

slang, mainly US short for neighbourhood

-hood

suffix forming nouns

indicating state or condition of beingmanhood; adulthood
indicating a body of personsknighthood; priesthood

Word Origin for -hood

Old English -hād

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hood
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper