active

[ak-tiv]
|

adjective

noun


Origin of active

1300–50; < Latin āctīvus (see act, -ive); replacing Middle English actif < Middle French < Latin
Related formsac·tive·ly, adverbac·tive·ness, nounnon·ac·tive, adjective, nounpre·ac·tive, adjectivepre·ac·tive·ly, adverbpre·ac·tive·ness, nounqua·si-ac·tive, adjectivequa·si-ac·tive·ly, adverbsem·i·ac·tive, adjectivesem·i·ac·tive·ly, adverbsem·i·ac·tive·ness, nounsu·per·ac·tive, adjectivesu·per·ac·tive·ly, adverbsu·per·ac·tive·ness, noun

Synonyms for active

Synonym study

3. Active, energetic, strenuous, vigorous imply a liveliness and briskness in accomplishing something. Active suggests quickness and diligence as opposed to laziness or dilatory methods: an active and useful person. Energetic suggests forceful and intense, sometimes nervous, activity: conducting an energetic campaign. Strenuous implies arduous and zealous activity with a sense of urgency: a strenuous effort. Vigorous suggests strong, effective activity: using vigorous measures to accomplish an end.

Antonyms for active

1. lazy. 5. sluggish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for actives

active

adjective

in a state of action; moving, working, or doing something
busy or involvedan active life
physically energetic
exerting influence; effectivean active ingredient
grammar
  1. denoting a voice of verbs used to indicate that the subject of a sentence is performing the action or causing the event or process described by the verb, as kicked in The boy kicked the footballCompare passive (def. 5)
  2. another word for nonstative
being fully engaged in military service (esp in the phrase on active service)
(of a volcano) erupting periodically; not extinctCompare dormant (def. 3), extinct (def. 3)
astronomy (of the sun) exhibiting a large number of sunspots, solar flares, etc, and a marked variation in intensity and frequency of radio emissionCompare quiet (def. 8)
commerce
  1. producing or being used to produce profit, esp in the form of interestactive balances
  2. of or denoting stocks or shares that have been actively bought and sold as recorded in the Official List of the London Stock Exchange
electronics
  1. containing a source of poweran active network
  2. capable of amplifying a signal or controlling some functionan active component; an active communication satellite

noun

grammar
  1. the active voice
  2. an active verb
mainly US a member of an organization who participates in its activities
Derived Formsactively, adverbactiveness, noun

Word Origin for active

C14: from Latin āctīvus. See act, -ive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for actives

active

adj.

mid-14c., "given to worldly activity" (opposed to contemplative or monastic), from Old French actif (12c.) or directly from Latin activus, from actus (see act (n.)). As "capable of acting" (opposed to passive), from late 14c. Meaning "energetic, lively" is from 1590s; that of "working, effective, in operation" is from 1640s. Active voice is recorded from 1765 (grammatical use of active dates from mid-15c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper