admissible

[ad-mis-uh-buh l]
See more synonyms for admissible on Thesaurus.com

Origin of admissible

1605–15; < Latin admiss- (see admission) + -ible; or < French, formed from same elements
Related formsad·mis·si·bil·i·ty, ad·mis·si·ble·ness, nounad·mis·si·bly, adverbnon·ad·mis·si·bil·i·ty, nounnon·ad·mis·si·ble, adjectivenon·ad·mis·si·ble·ness, nounnon·ad·mis·si·bly, adverbun·ad·mis·si·ble, adjectiveun·ad·mis·si·ble·ness, nounun·ad·mis·si·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for admissibility

Historical Examples of admissibility

  • The next requisite for the admissibility of a hypothesis is its sufficiency.

  • He was cheerfully helpless and sociably indifferent; ready to preside with a smile even at a discussion of his own admissibility.

    The Tragic Muse

    Henry James

  • Logic is the architect of this region, and for it there is no limit to the admissibility of hypotheses.

    The Mystery of Space

    Robert T. Browne

  • I shall not discuss the admissibility of these stamps into a collection, although opinion is divided.

  • If there is some question about admissibility of the charted enlargements, it is well to prepare an extra uncharted set.

    The Science of Fingerprints

    Federal Bureau of Investigation


British Dictionary definitions for admissibility

admissible

adjective
  1. able or deserving to be considered or allowed
  2. deserving to be admitted or allowed to enter
  3. law (esp of evidence) capable of being or bound to be admitted in a court of law
Derived Formsadmissibility or admissibleness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for admissibility
n.

1763, from admissible + -ity.

admissible

adj.

1610s, from Middle French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere (see admit). Legal sense is recorded from 1849.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper