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adreno-

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a combining form representing adrenal or adrenaline in compound words: adrenocortical.
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SHALL WE PLAY A "SHALL" VS. "SHOULD" CHALLENGE?
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Which form is used to state an obligation or duty someone has?
Also especially before a vowel, adren-.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

WORDS THAT USE ADRENO-

What does adreno- mean?

Adreno- is a combining form used like a prefix representing either adrenal or adrenaline, especially used in medical terms.

Adrenal relates to the adrenal glands, a pair of glands located above the kidneys that produce steroidal hormones, including adrenaline (also called epinephrine).

Adreno- is based on the Latin prefix ad-, meaning “toward,” and rēnēs, “kidney.” You can use that to remember where the adrenal glands are found in the body!

What are variants of adreno-?

When combined with words or word elements that begin with a vowel, adreno- becomes adren-, as in adrenergic.

Examples of adreno-

An example of a word you may have encountered that features adreno- is adrenocortical, meaning “relating to, or produced by, the cortex of the adrenal gland.” This term is most frequently found in relation to steroids.

The first part of the word, adreno-, refers to the adrenal gland, as we have seen. The second half, -cortical, represents cortex, the outer portion of a gland or organ. Adrenocortical, then, has the literal sense of “cortex of the adrenal gland.”

What are some words that use the combining form adreno-?

What are some other forms that adreno- may be commonly confused with?

Break it down!

A receptor is a term for protein molecules on cell surfaces that can respond to and bind with other molecules.

Based on the meaning of adreno-, what hormones do adrenoreceptors bind with?

Medical definitions for adreno-

adreno-

pref.
Adrenal gland; adrenal:adrenomegaly.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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