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Arnold, Benedict

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An American general of the Revolutionary War. He performed notably in the early days of the war but became bitter over several setbacks to his career. After receiving command of the American fort at West Point, New York, Arnold plotted to betray it to the British. The plan was revealed when the American forces captured Major John André of the British army, who was carrying messages between Arnold and the British. Arnold escaped to England and continued a military career, but he was widely scorned by the English.

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QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!
Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

notes for Arnold, Benedict

Calling someone a “Benedict Arnold” is to label the person a traitor.

Words nearby Arnold, Benedict

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

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