authority

[ uh-thawr-i-tee, uh-thor- ]
/ əˈθɔr ɪ ti, əˈθɒr- /

noun, plural au·thor·i·ties.

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Origin of authority

1200–50; earlier auct(h)oritie < Latin auctōritās; replacing Middle English autorite < Old French < L. See author, -ity

synonym study for authority

1. Authority, control, influence denote a power or right to direct the actions or thoughts of others. Authority is a power or right, usually because of rank or office, to issue commands and to punish for violations: to have authority over subordinates. Control is either power or influence applied to the complete and successful direction or manipulation of persons or things: to be in control of a project. Influence is a personal and unofficial power derived from deference of others to one's character, ability, or station; it may be exerted unconsciously or may operate through persuasion: to have influence over one's friends.

OTHER WORDS FROM authority

an·ti·au·thor·i·ty, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for authority

British Dictionary definitions for authority

authority
/ (ɔːˈθɒrɪtɪ) /

noun plural -ties

Word Origin for authority

C14: from French autorité, from Latin auctōritas, from auctor author
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012