Origin of bother

1710–20; originally Hiberno-English; probably by hypercorrection from bodder, an alternate early form; origin obscure

synonym study for bother

1. Bother, annoy, plague, tease imply persistent interference with one's comfort or peace of mind. Bother suggests causing trouble or weariness or repeatedly interrupting in the midst of pressing duties. To annoy is to vex or irritate by bothering. Plague is a strong word, connoting unremitting annoyance and harassment. To tease is to pester, as by long-continued whining and begging.

OTHER WORDS FROM bother

un·both·ered, adjectiveun·both·er·ing, adjective
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Example sentences from the Web for bother

British Dictionary definitions for bother

bother
/ (ˈbɒðə) /

verb

noun

interjection

mainly British an exclamation of slight annoyance

Word Origin for bother

C18: perhaps from Irish Gaelic bodhar deaf, vexed; compare Irish Gaelic buairim I vex
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012