bumper

1
[buhm-per]

noun

adjective

unusually abundant: Bumper crops reaped a big profit for local farmers.

verb (used with object)

to fill to the brim.

Origin of bumper

1
First recorded in 1750–60; bump + -er1

bumper

2
[buhm-per]

noun Australian Slang.

the unconsumed end of a cigarette; cigarette butt.

Origin of bumper

2
1915–20; expressive coinage, perhaps blend of butt1 and stump + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for bumper

Contemporary Examples of bumper

  • Bumper stickers proclaiming “Gitmo Saves Lives” can be purchased at keepamericasafe.com for $5.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Next Dick

    Michelle Cottle

    September 2, 2011

  • Bumper stickers have even been printed that say "No to the murtazeqa," beside a silhouette of a man wearing a yellow hardhat.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Libya's Hysteria Over African Mercenaries

    Babak Dehghanpisheh

    March 6, 2011

Historical Examples of bumper


British Dictionary definitions for bumper

bumper

1

noun

a horizontal metal bar attached to the front or rear end of a car, lorry, etc, to protect against damage from impact
a person or machine that bumps
cricket a ball bowled so that it bounces high on pitching; bouncer

bumper

2

noun

a glass, tankard, etc, filled to the brim, esp as a toast
an unusually large or fine example of something

adjective

unusually large, fine, or abundanta bumper crop

verb

(tr) to toast with a bumper
(tr) to fill to the brim
(intr) to drink bumpers

Word Origin for bumper

C17 (in the sense: a brimming glass): probably from bump (obsolete vb) to bulge; see bump

bumper

3

noun

Australian old-fashioned, informal a cigarette end

Word Origin for bumper

C19: perhaps from a blend of butt 1 and stump
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bumper
n.

1670s, "glass filled to the brim;" perhaps from notion of bumping as "large," or from a related sense of "booming" (see bump (v.)). Meaning "anything unusually large" is from 1759, slang. Agent-noun meaning "buffer of a car" is from 1839, American English, originally in reference to railway cars; 1901 of automobiles (in phrase bumper-to-bumper, in reference to a hypothetical situation; of actual traffic jams by 1908).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper