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bungalow

[buhng-guh-loh]
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noun
  1. a cottage of one story.
  2. (in India) a one-storied thatched or tiled house, usually surrounded by a veranda.
  3. (in the U.S.) a derivation of the Indian house type, popular especially during the first quarter of the 20th century, usually having one and a half stories, a widely bracketed gable roof, and a multi-windowed dormer and frequently built of rustic materials.
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Origin of bungalow

First recorded in 1670–80, bungalow is from the Hindi word banglā literally, of Bengal
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bungalow

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • It was a one-storey building, a sort of bungalow, built entirely of wood.

  • Then she went swiftly for her topee and gloves and parasol, and fled from the bungalow.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • She no longer wondered that Fay refused to leave the bungalow.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • He will meet you and bring you to the bungalow, so look out for him when the boat gets in.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker

  • Jan made no answer, and silence reigned till they reached the bungalow.

    Jan and Her Job

    L. Allen Harker


British Dictionary definitions for bungalow

bungalow

noun
  1. a one-storey house, sometimes with an attic
  2. (in India) a one-storey house, usually surrounded by a veranda
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Word Origin

C17: from Hindi banglā (house) of the Bengal type
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bungalow

n.

1670s, from Gujarati bangalo, from Hindi bangla "low, thatched house," literally "Bengalese," used elliptically for "house in the Bengal style" (see Bengal). Related: Bungaloid.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper