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cage

[ keyj ]
/ keɪdʒ /
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noun
verb (used with object), caged, cag·ing.
to put or confine in or as if in a cage.
Sports. to shoot (as a puck) into a cage so as to score a goal.
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Origin of cage

First recorded in 1175–1225; Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cavea “birdcage,” equivalent to cav(us) “hollow” + -ea, feminine of -eus adjective suffix

OTHER WORDS FROM cage

cageless, adjectivecagelike, adjectivere·cage, verb (used with object), re·caged, re·cag·ing.

Other definitions for cage (2 of 2)

Cage
[ keyj ]
/ keɪdʒ /

noun
John, 1912–1992, U.S. composer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use cage in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cage (1 of 2)

cage
/ (keɪdʒ) /

noun
verb
(tr) to confine in or as in a cage

Word Origin for cage

C13: from Old French, from Latin cavea enclosure, from cavus hollow

British Dictionary definitions for cage (2 of 2)

Cage
/ (keɪdʒ) /

noun
John. 1912–92, US composer of experimental music for a variety of conventional, modified, or invented instruments. He evolved a type of music apparently undetermined by the composer, such as in Imaginary Landscape (1951) for 12 radio sets. Other works include Reunion (1968), Apartment Building 1776 (1976), and Europeras 3 and 4 (1990)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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