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Question 1 of 12
On the farm, the feed for chicks is significantly different from the roosters’; ______ not even comparable.

Origin of calm

First recorded in 1350–1400; (noun and adjective) Middle English calm(e), from Italian calma (noun), calmo (adjective), from Late Latin cauma “summer heat” (with l perhaps from Latin calēre “to be hot”), from Greek kaûma (stem kaumat- ) “burning heat”; akin to kaíein “to burn” (see caustic); (verb) Middle English calmen, from Italian calmare, derivative of the noun
3. Calm, collected, composed, cool imply the absence of agitation. Calm implies an unruffled state, especially under disturbing conditions: calm in a crisis. Collected implies complete inner command of oneself, usually as the result of an effort: He remained collected in spite of the excitement. One who is composed has or has gained dignified self-possession: pale but composed. Cool implies clarity of judgment along with apparent absence of strong feeling or excitement, especially in circumstances of danger or strain: so cool that he seemed calm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for calm

calm
/ (kɑːm) /

adjective

noun

verb

(often foll by down) to make or become calm
calmly, adverbcalmness, noun
C14: from Old French calme, from Old Italian calma, from Late Latin cauma heat, hence a rest during the heat of the day, from Greek kauma heat, from kaiein to burn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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