caper

1
[ key-per ]
/ ˈkeɪ pər /
|||

verb (used without object)

to leap or skip about in a sprightly manner; prance; frisk; gambol.

noun

a playful leap or skip.
a prank or trick; harebrained escapade.
a frivolous, carefree episode or activity.
Slang. a criminal or illegal act, as a burglary or robbery.

Nearby words

  1. capella,
  2. capelli d'angelo,
  3. capellini,
  4. capellmeister,
  5. capello,
  6. caper family,
  7. capercaillie,
  8. capernaum,
  9. capers,
  10. capeskin

Idioms

    cut a caper. cut(def 84).

Origin of caper

1
1585–95; figurative use of Latin caper he-goat (cognate with Old English hæfer, Old Norse hafr, Old Irish caera sheep < a West IE term *kap-(e)ro- for a domesticated smaller animal); for the meaning, cf. dog (v.)

SYNONYMS FOR caper
3. stunt, antic, shenanigans. 4. spree, frolic.

Related formsca·per·er, nounca·per·ing·ly, adverbun·ca·per·ing, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for capered


British Dictionary definitions for capered

caper

1
/ (ˈkeɪpə) /

noun

verb

(intr) to leap or dance about in a light-hearted manner
Derived Formscaperer, nouncaperingly, adverb

Word Origin for caper

C16: probably from capriole

caper

2
/ (ˈkeɪpə) /

noun

a spiny trailing Mediterranean capparidaceous shrub, Capparis spinosa, with edible flower buds
any of various similar plants or their edible partsSee also bean caper, capers

Word Origin for caper

C15: from earlier capers, capres (assumed to be plural), from Latin capparis, from Greek kapparis

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for capered
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper