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View synonyms for cash

cash

1

[ kash ]

noun

  1. money in the form of coins or banknotes, especially that issued by a government.
  2. money or an equivalent, as a check, paid at the time of making a purchase.


verb (used with object)

  1. to give or obtain cash for (a check, money order, etc.).
  2. Cards.
    1. to win (a trick) by leading an assured winner.
    2. to lead (an assured winner) in order to win a trick:

      He cashed his ace and led the queen.

verb phrase

  1. to profit from; use to one's advantage:

    swindlers who cash in on the credulity of the public.

    1. to turn in and get cash for (one's chips), as in a gambling casino.
    2. to end or withdraw from a business agreement; convert one's assets into cash.
    3. Slang. to die:

      After her parents cashed in, she lived with her grandmother.

cash

2

[ kash ]

noun

, plural cash.
  1. any of several low-denomination coins of China, India, and the East Indies, especially a Chinese copper coin.

Cash

3

[ kash ]

noun

  1. John Johnny, 1932–2003, U.S. country-and-western singer, musician, and composer.

cash

1

/ kæʃ /

noun

  1. banknotes and coins, esp in hand or readily available; money or ready money
  2. immediate payment, in full or part, for goods or services (esp in the phrase cash down )
  3. modifier of, for, or paid by cash

    a cash transaction

  4. the cash
    the cash a checkout counter


verb

  1. tr to obtain or pay ready money for

    to cash a cheque

Cash

2

/ kæʃ /

noun

  1. CashJohnny19322003MUSMUSIC: country singerMUSIC: guitaristMUSIC: songwriter Johnny. 1932–2003, US country-and-western singer, guitarist, and songwriter. His recordings include the hits "I Walk the Line" (1956), "Ring of Fire" (1963), "A Boy named Sue" (1969), and the American Recordings series of albums (1994–2003)

cash

3

/ kæʃ /

noun

  1. any of various Chinese, Indonesian, or Indian coins of low value

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Derived Forms

  • ˈcashable, adjective

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Other Words From

  • casha·ble adjective
  • casha·bili·ty noun
  • casha·ble·ness noun
  • un·cashed adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of cash1

First recorded in 1590–1600; from Middle French casse, from Old Italian cassa, from Latin capsa “(cylindrical) case (for books)”; cashier 1

Origin of cash2

First recorded in 1590–1600; from Portuguese caixa, from Tamil kācu the name of a copper coin, from Sanskrit karṣa a weight (of precious metal)

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Word History and Origins

Origin of cash1

C16: from Old Italian cassa money box, from Latin capsa case ²

Origin of cash2

C16: from Portuguese caixa, from Tamil kāsu, from Sanskrit karsa weight of gold or silver

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Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. cash in one's chips, Slang. to die.

More idioms and phrases containing cash

  • cold cash

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Example Sentences

The campaign must report its cash on hand for the end of August by Sunday’s regulatory deadline.

For a little extra cash up front, it significantly increases the protection for your machine.

In theory, CBD could be a cash cow for publishers’ commerce operations, thanks to exploding consumer interest in the category and audiences of stressed out people who have spent much of 2020 stuck in their homes.

From Digiday

The company is not the only one that wants to parlay a cash transfer app into a banking empire—PayPal is rushing to do the same with its Venmo app.

From Fortune

Today, more than half of the world’s 193 countries will trade citizenship or residency for cash.

From Quartz

One that they cannot cash in at the bank to pay for their flats.

Crain posted a cash bond of $102.50 apiece shortly before 1:30 P.M., and they returned to the Castle Hotel.

Mister Ham in need of cash: That is something a lot of people will not believe.

Hitchcock was quick to add he didn't see the cash exchange hands, but he doesn't doubt it happened.

He pointed a pistol at a grocery checkout woman and swiped whatever cash he could into his pockets before booking it.

Were you ever arrested, having in your custody another man's cash, and would rather go to gaol, than break it?

The “Compañia General de Tabacos” lost about ₱30,000 in cash in addition to the damage done to their offices and property.

The promoters went his security and put up the cash into the bargain, and he went back to the publishing house victorious.

His wife had sold her relinquishment on the claim that he had spent thirty-five hundred dollars cash for.

It was very annoying—more than ever—to the Elder when he was required to put up twenty-five dollars in cash as a retainer.

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axolotl

[ak-suh-lot-l ]

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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“Casey Jones”cash account