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Chartism

[ chahr-tiz-uhm ]

noun

  1. the principles or movement of a party of political reformers, chiefly workingmen, in England from 1838 to 1848: so called from the document People's Charter, or National Charter that contained a statement of their principles and demands.


Chartism

/ ˈtʃɑːˌtɪzəm /

noun

  1. British history the principles of the reform movement in Britain from 1838 to 1848, which included manhood suffrage, payment of Members of Parliament, equal electoral districts, annual parliaments, voting by ballot, and the abolition of property qualifications for MPs


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Derived Forms

  • ˈChartist, nounadjective
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Other Words From

  • Chartist noun adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of Chartism1

First recorded in 1830–40; chart “charter” (now obsolete) + -ism; charta, -ism
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Word History and Origins

Origin of Chartism1

named after the People's Charter, a document which stated their aims
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Example Sentences

Chartism is defunct, notwithstanding the efforts made by its dishonoured and discomfited leaders to revive it.

In truth, it is the disasters they have produced which has revived Chartism, and rendered it so menacing in the land.

Chartism was a very feeble affair compared to the continental revolutions, and it flickered out in this year.

Old women with their distaffs rush out on a distressed Cellarer in shrill Chartism.

Chartism begins with a fierce attack upon the laissez faire theory, which showed blindness to this necessity.

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