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chiro

[ cheer-oh ]
/ ˈtʃɪər oʊ /
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noun, plural chi·ros.

the ladyfish, Elops saurus.

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Origin of chiro

Origin uncertain

Definition for chiro (2 of 2)

chiro-

a combining form meaning “hand,” used in the formation of compound words: chiromancy.
Also cheiro-.

Origin of chiro-

Combining form of Greek cheír hand
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

WORDS THAT USE CHIRO-

What does chiro- mean?

Chiro- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “hand.” It is often used in medical and scientific terms.

Chiro- comes from the Greek cheír, meaning “hand.” Bats (the winged mammals) are sometimes called chiropters, a name that literally means “hand-winged,” because their wing membranes are supported by the extended digits of the forelimbs. And chiromancy, another word for palmistry, is the art or practice of telling fortunes and interpreting character from the lines and configurations of the palm of a person’s hand; it literally means “hand divination.”

What are variants of chiro-?

When combined with words or word elements that begin with a vowel, chiro- becomes chir-. Another variant of chiro- is cheiro, as in cheirokinesthesia.

Examples of chiro-

You may have heard (or visited) a chiropractor, a practitioner of a therapeutic system, which is known as chiropractic and involves making adjustments on the spinal column.

The first part of these words, chiro-, means “hand.” The second part comes from the Greek word praktikós, source of practical and is based on a verb meaning “to do, act.” So, a chiropractor has the literal sense of “doing by hand,” a reference to how chiropractors use their hands to make adjustments to the spine.

What are some words that use the combining form chiro-?

What are some other forms that chiro- may be commonly confused with?

Break it down!

Keeping in mind that -graphy refers to “writing,” what is an everyday term for chirography?

British Dictionary definitions for chiro (1 of 2)

chiro
/ (ˈkaɪrəʊ) /

noun plural chiros

informal a chiropractor

British Dictionary definitions for chiro (2 of 2)

chiro-

cheiro-


combining form

indicating the hand; of or by means of the handchiromancy

Word Origin for chiro-

via Latin from Greek kheir hand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for chiro

chiro-

pref.

Variant ofcheiro-
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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