Advertisement

Advertisement

View synonyms for chord

chord

1

[ kawrd ]

noun

  1. a feeling or emotion:

    His story struck a chord of pity in the listeners.

  2. Geometry. the line segment between two points on a given curve.
  3. Engineering, Building Trades. a principal member of a truss extending from end to end, usually one of a pair of such members, more or less parallel and connected by a web composed of various compression and tension members.
  4. Aeronautics. a straight line joining the trailing and leading edges of an airfoil section.
  5. Anatomy. cord ( def 6 ).


chord

2

[ kawrd ]

noun

  1. a combination of usually three or more musical tones sounded simultaneously.

verb (used with object)

  1. to establish or play a chord or chords for (a particular harmony or song); harmonize or voice:

    How would you chord that in B flat?

chord

1

/ kɔːd /

noun

  1. the simultaneous sounding of a group of musical notes, usually three or more in number See concord discord


verb

  1. tr to provide (a melodic line) with chords

chord

2

/ kɔːd /

noun

  1. maths
    1. a straight line connecting two points on a curve or curved surface
    2. the line segment lying between two points of intersection of a straight line and a curve or curved surface
  2. engineering one of the principal members of a truss, esp one that lies along the top or the bottom
  3. anatomy a variant spelling of cord
  4. an emotional response, esp one of sympathy

    the story struck the right chord

  5. an imaginary straight line joining the leading edge and the trailing edge of an aerofoil
  6. archaic.
    the string of a musical instrument

chord

/ kôrd /

  1. A line segment that joins two points on a curve.
  2. A straight line connecting the leading and trailing edges of an airfoil.


chord

  1. In music, the sound of three or more notes played at the same time. The history of Western music is marked by an increase in complexity of the chords composers use.


Discover More

Derived Forms

  • ˈchordal, adjective
  • ˈchorded, adjective
Discover More

Other Words From

  • chorded adjective
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of chord1

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin chorda < Greek chordḗ gut, string; replacing cord in senses given

Origin of chord2

1350–1400; earlier cord, Middle English, short for accord; ch- from chord 1
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of chord1

C15: short for accord ; spelling influenced by chord 1

Origin of chord2

C16: from Latin chorda, from Greek khordē gut, string; see cord
Discover More

Idioms and Phrases

see strike a chord .
Discover More

Example Sentences

Music director Felton Offard contributes sharp guitar riffs and bluesy harmonica chords as a one-man backup band, separated from Butler by a plexiglass partition.

In the end most teams used smaller models that produced specific parts of a song, like the chords or melodies, and then stitched these together by hand.

Cable management grommets keep your desktop free of tangled chords, and waterproof and scratch resistant surfaces can handle any amount of wear.

What’s more, Nordstrom’s reputation for good customer service struck a chord with Smith, whose company is renowned for its generous returns policy.

From Fortune

In this year’s combustible political atmosphere, its uncontroversial purpose has struck a chord.

From Fortune

And the chord structure, for those of you who play an instrument, is unexpected and worth checking out.

The guitar is tuned to E, and an Eminor chord on a guitar just rings and rings forever.

It does strike a chord when you see just how victimizing some of the media reports can be of Africa.

But it is based on the chord structure of what I played before it, except that it was based on a diminished scale.

There were no longer any chord changes, and it was no longer a ballad.

In this position, the line of cavalry formed the chord of the arc described by the river, and occupied by us.

There is quite a little knack in letting the hand fall so, but when you have once got it, the chord sounds much richer and fuller.

When she struck the chord of G minor, it was the right preparation, and brought you immediately into the mood for what followed.

It produced comparatively little foundation tone and a powerful chord of harmonics, many of them dissonant.

No drooping Clytie could be more constant than I to him who strikes the chord that is responsive in my soul.

Advertisement

Related Words

Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


choral speakingchordal