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cleanser

[klen-zer]
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noun
  1. a preparation for cleansing, as a liquid or powder for scouring sinks, bathtubs, etc., or a cream for cleaning the face.
  2. a person or thing that cleanses.
  3. Chiefly Eastern New England. a dry-cleaning establishment.
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Origin of cleanser

before 1000; Middle English; Old English clǣnsere; see cleanse, -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for cleanser

detergent, deodorant, purifier, soap, abrasive, cathartic, suds, polish, antiseptic, purgative, lather, fumigant, scourer, abstergent

Examples from the Web for cleanser

Historical Examples of cleanser

  • The mrǵras, or cleanser of the night, the white cat, is the moon.

    Zoological Mythology (Volume II)

    Angelo de Gubernatis

  • The temples grow tawdry and foul and must be cleansed, and, let me remind you, the cleanser has always come out of the desert.'

    Prester John

    John Buchan

  • Bahuchet hastily made a bundle of the doublet and breeches, took it under his arm, and started for the cleanser's.

  • This will completely absorb any of the cleanser which may have permeated the rubber, and thus minimise any injurious effect.

    Practical Lithography

    Alfred Seymour

  • After the superfluous turpentine or other cleanser has been wiped off, dust over the blanket with French chalk.

    Practical Lithography

    Alfred Seymour


British Dictionary definitions for cleanser

cleanser

noun
  1. a cleansing agent, such as a detergent
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cleanser

n.

1520s, "a purgative;" 1560s, "one who cleans," agent noun from cleanse (v.). Meaning "thing that cleanses" is from late 14c. Old English had clænsere "priest."

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper