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cock

1
[ kok ]
/ kɒk /
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noun
verb (used with object)
verb (used without object)
to cock the firing mechanism of a firearm.
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Origin of cock

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English coc, cock, cocke, Old English coc, cocc; cognate with Old Norse kokkr; imitative of a rooster's crow

OTHER WORDS FROM cock

cock·like, adjective

Other definitions for cock (2 of 3)

cock2
[ kok ]
/ kɒk /

verb (used with object)
to set or turn up or to one side, often in an assertive, jaunty, or significant manner: He cocked his eyebrow questioningly.
verb (used without object)
to stand or stick up conspicuously.
Scot. and New England. to strut; swagger; put on airs of importance.
noun
the act of turning the head, a hat, etc., up or to one side in a jaunty or significant way.
the position of anything thus placed.

Origin of cock

2
First recorded in 1705–15; probably special use of cock1

Other definitions for cock (3 of 3)

cock3
[ kok ]
/ kɒk /

noun Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S.
a conical pile of hay, dung, etc.
verb (used with object)
to pile (hay, dung, etc.) in cocks.

Origin of cock

3
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English cok “cock (of hay), shock (of grain)”; cognate with dialectal German Kocke “heap of hay or dung”; akin to Norwegian kok “heap, lump,” Old Norse kǫkkr “lump”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use cock in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cock (1 of 2)

cock1
/ (kɒk) /

noun
verb
See also cockup

Word Origin for cock

Old English cocc (referring to the male fowl; the development of C15 sense spout, tap, and other transferred senses is not clear), ultimately of imitative origin; related to Old Norse kokkr, French coq, Late Latin coccus

British Dictionary definitions for cock (2 of 2)

cock2
/ (kɒk) /

noun
a small, cone-shaped heap of hay, straw, etc
verb
(tr) to stack (hay, straw, etc) in such heaps

Word Origin for cock

C14 (in Old English, cocc is attested in place names): perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian kok, Danish dialect kok
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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