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coerce

[ koh-urs ]
/ koʊˈɜrs /
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See synonyms for: coerce / coerced / coerces / coercer on Thesaurus.com

Definition of coerce

verb (used with object), co·erced, co·erc·ing.
to compel by force, intimidation, or authority, especially without regard for individual desire or volition: They coerced him into signing the document.
to bring about through the use of force or other forms of compulsion; exact: to coerce obedience.
to dominate or control, especially by exploiting fear, anxiety, etc.: The state is based on successfully coercing the individual.
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Origin of coerce

First recorded in 1425–75; late Middle English, from Latin coercēre “to hold in, restrain,” equivalent to co- co- + -ercēre, combining form of arcēre “to keep in, keep away,” akin to arca ark

OTHER WORDS FROM coerce

co·erc·er, nounco·er·ci·ble, adjectivenon·co·er·ci·ble, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH coerce

coerce , compel, constrain, force, oblige
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use coerce in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for coerce

coerce
/ (kəʊˈɜːs) /

verb
(tr) to compel or restrain by force or authority without regard to individual wishes or desires

Derived forms of coerce

coercer, nouncoercible, adjective

Word Origin for coerce

C17: from Latin coercēre to confine, restrain, from co- together + arcēre to enclose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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