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commissary

[ kom-uh-ser-ee ]
/ ˈkɒm əˌsɛr i /
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noun, plural com·mis·sar·ies.
a store that sells food and supplies to the personnel or workers in a military post, mining camp, lumber camp, or the like.
a dining room or cafeteria, especially one in a motion-picture studio.
a person to whom some responsibility or role is delegated by a superior power; a deputy.
(in France) a police official, usually just below the police chief in rank.
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Origin of commissary

1350–1400; Middle English commissarie (<Anglo-French ) <Medieval Latin commissārius, equivalent to Latin commiss(us) (past participle of committere to commit) + -ārius-ary

OTHER WORDS FROM commissary

com·mis·sar·i·al [kom-i-sair-ee-uhl], /ˌkɒm ɪˈsɛər i əl/, adjectivesub·com·mis·sar·i·al, adjectivesub·com·mis·sar·y, noun, plural sub·com·mis·sar·ies.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use commissary in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for commissary

commissary
/ (ˈkɒmɪsərɪ) /

noun plural -saries
US a shop supplying food or equipment, as in a military camp
US army an officer responsible for supplies and food
US a snack bar or restaurant in a film studio
a representative or deputy, esp an official representative of a bishop

Derived forms of commissary

commissarial (ˌkɒmɪˈsɛərɪəl), adjectivecommissaryship, noun

Word Origin for commissary

C14: from Medieval Latin commissārius official in charge, from Latin committere to entrust, commit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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