conclude

[kuh n-klood]

verb (used with object), con·clud·ed, con·clud·ing.

verb (used without object), con·clud·ed, con·clud·ing.

to come to an end; finish: The meeting concluded at ten o'clock.
to arrive at an opinion or judgment; come to a decision; decide: The jury concluded to set the accused free.

Origin of conclude

1250–1300; Middle English < Latin conclūdere to close, end an argument, equivalent to con- con- + -clūdere, combining form of claudere to close
Related formscon·clud·a·ble, con·clud·i·ble, adjectivecon·clud·er, nounnon·con·clud·ing, adjectivepre·con·clude, verb (used with object), pre·con·clud·ed, pre·con·clud·ing.un·con·clud·a·ble, adjectiveun·con·clud·ed, adjectivewell-con·clud·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for conclude

Contemporary Examples of conclude

Historical Examples of conclude

  • Nothing more having been heard of our poor little kitten, we can only conclude that she has gone overboard.

    A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam'

    Annie Allnut Brassey

  • In London they cite again the example of the wars of Napoleon, and conclude with: "What man has done man can do again."

    In the World War

    Count Ottokar Czernin

  • He was very clever at out-guessing a pitcher and being able to conclude what was coming.

    Pitching in a Pinch

    Christy Mathewson

  • To conclude ascetically is to give up, and not to solve, the problem.

    The Pocket R.L.S.

    Robert Louis Stevenson

  • But before I could conclude, she burst into a torrent of tears and rushed from the room.



British Dictionary definitions for conclude

conclude

verb (mainly tr)

(also intr) to come or cause to come to an end or conclusion
(takes a clause as object) to decide by reasoning; deducethe judge concluded that the witness had told the truth
to arrange finally; settleto conclude a treaty; it was concluded that he should go
obsolete to confine
Derived Formsconcluder, noun

Word Origin for conclude

C14: from Latin conclūdere to enclose, end, from claudere to close
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for conclude
v.

early 14c., "end an argument," from Latin concludere "to shut up, enclose," from com- "together" (see com-) + -cludere, comb. form of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). Meaning "reach a mental conclusion, deduce" is from late 14c., a sense also in Latin. Related: Concluded; concluding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper