conjure

[ kon-jer, kuhn- for 1–5, 8–10, 12; kuhn-joor for 6, 7, 11 ]
/ ˈkɒn dʒər, ˈkʌn- for 1–5, 8–10, 12; kənˈdʒʊər for 6, 7, 11 /

verb (used with object), con·jured, con·jur·ing.

verb (used without object), con·jured, con·jur·ing.

noun

Chiefly Southern U.S. an act or instance of witchcraft or voodoo, especially a spell.

Nearby words

  1. conjunctivoplasty,
  2. conjuncture,
  3. conjunto,
  4. conjuration,
  5. conjurator,
  6. conjure man,
  7. conjure up,
  8. conjurer,
  9. conjuring,
  10. conjuror

Origin of conjure

1250–1300; Middle English conjuren < Anglo-French, Old French conjurer < Latin conjūrāre, equivalent to con- con- + jūrāre to swear, derivative of jūs law; cf. jury1, justice

Related formsun·con·jured, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for conjure


British Dictionary definitions for conjure

conjure

/ (ˈkʌndʒə) /

verb

(intr) to practise conjuring or be a conjuror
(intr) to call upon supposed supernatural forces by spells and incantations
(kənˈdʒʊə) (tr) to appeal earnestly or strongly toI conjure you to help me
a name to conjure with
  1. a person thought to have great power or influence
  2. any name that excites the imagination

Word Origin for conjure

C13: from Old French conjurer to plot, from Latin conjūrāre to swear together, form a conspiracy, from jūrāre to swear

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012