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construe

[ verb kuhn-stroo or, especially British, kon-stroo; noun kon-stroo ]
/ verb kənˈstru or, especially British, ˈkɒn stru; noun ˈkɒn stru /
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See synonyms for: construe / construed on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), con·strued, con·stru·ing.

verb (used without object), con·strued, con·stru·ing.

to admit of grammatical analysis or interpretation.

noun

the act of construing.
something that is construed.

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Origin of construe

1325–75; Middle English construen<Latin construere to put together, build, equivalent to con-con- + struere to pile up, arrange, perhaps akin to sternere to spread, strew; see stratum
con·stru·er, nounun·con·strued, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for construe

construe
/ (kənˈstruː) /

verb -strues, -struing or -strued (mainly tr)

to interpret the meaning of (something)you can construe that in different ways
(may take a clause as object) to discover by inference; deduce
to analyse the grammatical structure of; parse (esp a Latin or Greek text as a preliminary to translation)
to combine (words) syntactically
(also intr) old-fashioned to translate literally, esp aloud as an academic exercise

noun

old-fashioned something that is construed, such as a piece of translation
construable, adjectiveconstruability, nounconstruer, noun
C14: from Latin construere to pile up; see construct
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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