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consubstantial

[ kon-suhb-stan-shuhl ]
/ ˌkɒn səbˈstæn ʃəl /
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adjective
of one and the same substance, essence, or nature, especially the three divine persons of the Christian Trinity.
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Origin of consubstantial

First recorded in 1450–1500; late Middle English, from Late Latin consubstantiālis, equivalent to con- prefix + substanti(a) “existence, corporeal existence” + -ālis adjective suffix; see origin at con-, substantial

OTHER WORDS FROM consubstantial

con·sub·stan·tial·ism, nouncon·sub·stan·tial·ist, nouncon·sub·stan·ti·al·i·ty, nouncon·sub·stan·tial·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use consubstantial in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for consubstantial

consubstantial
/ (ˌkɒnsəbˈstænʃəl) /

adjective
Christian theol (esp of the three persons of the Trinity) regarded as identical in substance or essence though different in aspect

Derived forms of consubstantial

consubstantiality, nounconsubstantially, adverb

Word Origin for consubstantial

C15: from Church Latin consubstāntiālis, from Latin com- + substantia substance
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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