cooking

[ koo k-ing ]
/ ˈkʊk ɪŋ /

noun

the act of a person or thing that cooks.
the art or practice of preparing food; cookery.

adjective

used in preparing foods: a cooking utensil.
fit to eat when cooked (distinguished from eating): cooking apples.

Origin of cooking

First recorded in 1635–45; cook1 + -ing1, -ing2
Related formsself-cook·ing, adjective

Definition for cooking (2 of 3)

Origin of cook

1
before 1000; (noun) Middle English cok(e), Old English cōc (compare Old Norse kokkr, German Koch, Dutch kok) < Latin cocus, coquus, derivative of coquere to cook; akin to Greek péptein (see peptic); (v.) late Middle English coken, derivative of the noun
Related formscook·a·ble, adjectivecook·less, adjectiveun·cook·a·ble, adjective

Definition for cooking (3 of 3)

cook

2
[ kook, koo k ]
/ kuk, kʊk /

verb (used without object) Scot.

to hide, especially outdoors, as by crouching down behind a hedge.

Origin of cook

2
1780–90; perhaps blend of Middle English couche bend, stoop (see couch) and Middle English croke bend, stoop (see crooked)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for cooking

British Dictionary definitions for cooking (1 of 3)

cook

/ (kʊk) /

verb


noun

a person who prepares food for eating, esp as an occupation
See also cook up
Derived Formscookable, adjectivecooking, noun

Word Origin for cook

Old English cōc (n), from Latin coquus a cook, from coquere to cook

British Dictionary definitions for cooking (2 of 3)

Cook

1
/ (kʊk) /

noun Mount Cook

a mountain in New Zealand, in the South Island, in the Southern Alps: the highest peak in New Zealand. Height: reduced in 1991 by a rockfall from 3764 m (12 349 ft) to 3754 m (12 316 ft)Official name: Aoraki-Mount Cook
a mountain in SE Alaska, in the St Elias Mountains. Height: 4194 m (13 760 ft)

British Dictionary definitions for cooking (3 of 3)

Cook

2
/ (kʊk) /

noun

Captain James . 1728–79, British navigator and explorer: claimed the E coast of Australia for Britain, circumnavigated New Zealand, and discovered several Pacific and Atlantic islands (1768–79)
Sir Joseph. 1860–1947, Australian statesman, born in England: prime minister of Australia (1913–14)
Peter (Edward). 1937–95, British comedy actor and writer, noted esp for his partnership (1960–73) with Dudley Moore
Robin, full name Robert Finlayson Cook . 1946–2005, British Labour politician; foreign secretary (1997–2001), Leader of the House (2001-2003)
Thomas. 1808–92, British travel agent; innovator of conducted excursions and founder of the travel agents Thomas Cook and Son

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with cooking

cook

In addition to the idioms beginning with cook

  • cook someone's goose
  • cook the books
  • cook up
  • cook with gas

also see:

  • chief cook and bottlewasher
  • short order (cook)
  • too many cooks spoil the broth
  • what's cooking

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.