corporal

1
[ kawr-per-uhl, -pruhl ]
/ ˈkɔr pər əl, -prəl /

adjective

of the human body; bodily; physical: corporal suffering.
Zoology. of the body proper, as distinguished from the head and limbs.
personal: corporal possession.
Obsolete. corporeal; belonging to the material world.

Origin of corporal

1
1350–1400; Middle English corporall (< Anglo-French) < Latin corporālis bodily, equivalent to corpor- (stem of corpus corpus) + -ālis -al1

Related forms

cor·po·ral·i·ty, nouncor·po·ral·ly, adverb

Definition for corporal (2 of 3)

corporal

2
[ kawr-per-uh l, -pruh l ]
/ ˈkɔr pər əl, -prəl /

noun

Military.
  1. a noncommissioned officer ranking above a private first class in the U.S. Army or lance corporal in the Marines and below a sergeant.
  2. a similar rank in the armed services of other countries.
(initial capital letter) a U.S. surface-to-surface, single-stage ballistic missile.

Origin of corporal

2
1570–80; < Middle French, variant of caporal (influenced by corporal corporal1) < Italian caporale, apparently contraction of phrase capo corporale corporal head, i.e., head of a body (of soldiers). See caput

Related forms

cor·po·ral·cy, cor·po·ral·ship, noun

Definition for corporal (3 of 3)

corporal

3
[ kawr-per-uh l, -pruh l ]
/ ˈkɔr pər əl, -prəl /

noun Ecclesiastical.

a fine cloth, usually of linen, on which the consecrated elements are placed or with which they are covered.

Origin of corporal

3
1350–1400; Middle English corporalle < Medieval Latin corporale (pallium) eucharistic (altar cloth); replacing earlier corporas < Old French < Latin, as above
Also called communion cloth.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for corporal

British Dictionary definitions for corporal (1 of 3)

corporal

1
/ (ˈkɔːpərəl, -prəl) /

adjective

of or relating to the body; bodily
an obsolete word for corporeal

Derived Forms

corporality, nouncorporally, adverb

Word Origin for corporal

C14: from Latin corporālis of the body, from corpus body

British Dictionary definitions for corporal (2 of 3)

corporal

2
/ (ˈkɔːpərəl, -prəl) /

noun

a noncommissioned officer junior to a sergeant in the army, air force, or marines
(in the Royal Navy) a petty officer who assists the master-at-arms

Derived Forms

corporalship, noun

Word Origin for corporal

C16: from Old French, via Italian, from Latin caput head; perhaps also influenced in Old French by corps body (of men)

British Dictionary definitions for corporal (3 of 3)

corporal

3

corporale (ˌkɔːpəˈreɪlɪ)

/ (ˈkɔːpərəl, -prəl) /

noun

a white linen cloth on which the bread and wine are placed during the Eucharist

Word Origin for corporal

C14: from Medieval Latin corporāle pallium eucharistic altar cloth, from Latin corporālis belonging to the body, from corpus body (of Christ)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012