creamer

[ kree-mer ]
/ ˈkri mər /

noun

a person or thing that creams.
a small jug, pitcher, etc., for holding cream.
a container or apparatus for separating cream from milk.
a refrigerator in which milk is placed to facilitate the formation of cream.
a nondairy product in powder or liquid form, made chiefly from corn syrup solids and used as a substitute for cream, especially for coffee cream.

Nearby words

  1. cream sauce,
  2. cream soda,
  3. cream tea,
  4. cream-crackered,
  5. creamcups,
  6. creamery,
  7. creamlaid,
  8. creampuff,
  9. creamware,
  10. creamwove

Origin of creamer

First recorded in 1855–60; cream + -er1

Origin of cream

1300–50; Middle English creme < Anglo-French, Old French cresme < Late Latin chrīsma chrism

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for creamer


British Dictionary definitions for creamer

creamer

/ (ˈkriːmə) /

noun

a vessel or device for separating cream from milk
a powdered substitute for cream, used in coffee
mainly US and Canadian a small jug or pitcher for serving cream

cream

/ (kriːm) /

noun

verb

Derived Formscreamlike, adjective

Word Origin for cream

C14: from Old French cresme, from Late Latin crāmum cream, of Celtic origin; influenced by Church Latin chrisma unction, chrism

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for creamer
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for creamer

cream

[ krēm ]

n.

The yellowish fatty component of unhomogenized milk that tends to accumulate at the surface.
A pharmaceutical preparation consisting of a semisolid emulsion of either the oil-in-water or the water-in-oil type, ordinarily intended for topical use.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.